Thursday October 26th, 2017
Topic: Customer Relationship Management
Mr. Brian, B.S.  Electrical Engineering, M.S. Electrical Engineering and Computer Science


The topic for the evening will be Customer Management; How Software can improve the Customer Interface. This talk will define Customer Relationship Management and discuss its supporting software. Mr. Michael Baran will explain what it is, and how it interacts with different people based on their roles and what benefits it brings to those who use it.  He will also show why some systems are very successful while others failed to be implemented properly and thereby did not produce the desired results.

Our speaker for the meeting will be Mr. Baran who has a B.S. in Electrical Engineering and an M.S. in EE and Computer Science.  In addition to working as a design engineer, he has had a number of jobs in managements and sales, consulting for many well-known companies, such as Intel, IBM, Citibank, Nissan, etc. Currently semi-retired, Mr. Baran is doing consulting work primarily for Colorado State University in Salesforce Customer Relationship Management.
 


 

Thursday September 23rd, 2017
Topic: Designer Drugs
Dr. Kristen Kent, MD, FAAEM board-certified emergency physician


The topic for the evening was Designer Drugs. Designer drugs are synthesized to chemically and psychoactively mimic known illict drugs, made to avoid the law, and are skillfully marketed. Using opioids as an example, our speaker Dr. Kent, discussed advances in chemistry and medicine over the past several hundred  years that evolved natural plants into the first designer drugs. She discussed advances in pharmaceutics, genetics, information technology in recent decades that contributed to proliferation and popularity of designer drugs causing a global public health crisis.

Our speaker for the meeting was Kristen Kent, MD, FAAEM a board-certified emergency physician. She received a B.S. in Exercise Science and M.D. from the University of Iowa.  She graduated from the Emergency Medicine Residency Program at the University of Massachusetts and trained in medical toxicology for an additional year after residency. 

Over the past ten years, Dr. Kent has worked in various emergency departments from small hospitals in rural areas to urban level-one trauma centers. 




Thursday February  23rd 2017

Topic: Nextgen Inventing the Next Generation Airspace
Kristen Kasper, Project Manager, Florida NextGen Test Bed (FTB)

The global aviation community is involved in a monumental effort to incorporate new technologies into air traffic control. The development of ubiquitous Networking, global positioning systems, air traffic growth, and the introduction of unmanned aerial vehicles requires that new policies and systems be developed to handle these new features efficiently and safely.  This talk will present how the FAA and global partners are modernizing our airspace and will provide examples of specific activities taking place at ERAU and the ERAU-managed Florida Test Bed.

Our Speaker - Kisten Kasper works at the Florida NextGen Test Bed (FTB)  as a Project Manager.  The FTB is a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) initiative, manged by Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU), being used to integrate and demonstrate NextGen and legacy technologies into existing and planed enhancements for the National Airspace System (NAS).  The FTB is designed to provide stakeholders with a rapid integration capability for testing Operational Improvements and enablers by leveraging the National Airspace System (NAS) using protype capabilities.  It utilizes a cost-effective and scalable architecture to allow for new growth as the Operational improvements and enablers evolve.  She enjoys the interaction between government, academic, and and industry in the position and the many challenges and opportunities it brings.




Thursday March 23rd, 2017
Topic: A Night of Potpourri With The Old Professor
Dr. Al Helfrick, Professor Emeritus at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

The Old Professor is back again this year for our March Meeting with another "Night of Potpourri with the Old Professor."  Al Helrick has not divulged exactly what the subjects will be, but promises it will be about technology, engineering, a bit of history, national , international and local.  In other Words, potpourri and, of course, presented with The Old Professor's usual whimsy.  If's its like last year, it promises to be a good night.

Our Speaker: Dr. Al Helfrick is Professor Emeritus of Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. He started his career in radiation hardening of military systems, then after a military stint (including a tour of duty in Vietnam), continued in the fields of cable television, test and measurement, avionics and finally as an independent consultant.  Dr. Helfrick joined ERAU in 1991 and retired in 2015 after serving as both a professor and department chair.  He is still active in academia, continues to publish and present papers at conference, and occasionally regales audiences with reminiscences from his career. 








Thursday February  23rd 2017

Topic: Nextgen Inventing the Next Generation Airspace
Kristen Kasper, Project Manager, Florida NextGen Test Bed (FTB)

The global aviation community is involved in a monumental effort to incorporate new technologies into air traffic control. The development of ubiquitous Networking, global positioning systems, air traffic growth, and the introduction of unmanned aerial vehicles requires that new policies and systems be developed to handle these new features efficiently and safely.  This talk will present how the FAA and global partners are modernizing our airspace and will provide examples of specific activities taking place at ERAU and the ERAU-managed Florida Test Bed.

Our Speaker:   Kisten Kasper works at the Florida NextGen Test Bed (FTB)  as a Project Manager.  The FTB is a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) initiative, manged by Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU), being used to integrate and demonstrate NextGen and legacy technologies into existing and planed enhancements for the National Airspace System (NAS).  The FTB is designed to provide stakeholders with a rapid integration capability for testing Operational Improvements and enablers by leveraging the National Airspace System (NAS) using protype capabilities.  It utilizes a cost-effective and scalable architecture to allow for new growth as the Operational improvements and enablers evolve.  She enjoys the interaction between government, academic, and and industry in the position and the many challenges and opportunities it brings.



   

Thursday January 26th 2017
Topic: The Food and Drug Administration as it Relates to the Medical Device Industry
James H. Brown, President of Caird Technology Inc.

As it is generally understood that the Food and Drug Administration's responsibilities are to approve and regulate foods and drugs available to the public.  However, among its responsibilities is also to regulate and control  medical devices.  January's presentation will discuss the role of the FDA including: What the FDA is responsible for, what the FDA is NOT responsible for, devices classification, the medical device approval and inspection process, lobbying the FDA and the speaker's personnel experiences with the FDA.

Our Speaker:  James H. Brown is President of Caird Technology, Inc., which is a developer of medical devices for the physician office market.  The company has developed and markets ECG Systems,  Spirometry Systems, Ambulatory ECG Systems, and Autonomic Nervous System testing devices.  Mr. Brown holds a Master's degree in Electrical Engineering from Polytechnic Institute of New York.  During his 35 year career, he has held a number of engineering and executive positions with medical device manufactures as well as the developer of diagnostics for a ship stimulator for the Merchant Marine Academy with the Sperry Corporation.








Thursday December  1st, 2016
Topic: Why is SIRI so annoying? - Techniques and Limitations of Natural Language Human Computer Interaction
Speaker: Dr. Keith Garfield - College of Engineering, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

As more devices in our world become "smart" our need to interact with them grows, and the way in which we  interact is likely to change.  Speech interfaces are being introduced as a natural and intuitive mode of interaction.  Unfortunately. the use of speech interfaces can provide a user with a false sense of system capability, which leads to frustration when those capabilities are not present.  Dr. Garfield will discuss the challenges implicit in natural language processing and natural language understanding that limit vocal interfaces.  He will also discuss techniques used to overcome or reduce the impact of those challenges.

Our Speaker:  Dr. Keith Garfield began his career as a structural engineer with McDonnell-Douglas, designing and testing space flight hardware used on a variety of satellites.  Following that, he worked on the shuttle payload integration team at the Kennedy Space Center before becoming a researcher at the Institute for Modeling and Simulation at the University of Florida.  Dr. Garfield teaches the formal mathematics and formal representations necessary to pursue software and computer engineering disciplines.  Dr. Garfield  uses his experience  in the corporate and academic fields to relate classroom material to real world applications. 








Thursday October  27th, 2016
Monstrous Madmen: Portrayals of the Engineer and Potential Impacts
  Jeanette B. Barott -  College of Engineering, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Portrayals of the engineer in popular culture have been troubled since before "engineer" was a profession (1850 in the US), or "popular culture" a phrase (1854 according to the OED).  Starting with the framework of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein as a book and within subsequent portrayals, and delving back to Gulliver's Travels and up to Big Bang Theory, Firefly, and, of course, the Star Trek universe, representations of the engineer's role within society as portrayed through the lens of the liberal arts will be explored in a fast-paced, entertaining manner. Underscoring the entertainment, however, in a crucial question: has the ever-widening gap between "us" the engineers and "them" the liberal arts majors resulted in damage to our STEM pipeline-and how can we, the engineers, fix it (given that the entertainment and therefore edutainment industries are predominatly managed by "them").

Our Speaker: Jeanette B. Barott is a Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and the Chair of the Daytona Section. She has degrees in English Literature and in Software engineering, and is an active advocate of STEM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and math) education throughout the eucational pipeline.  For her day-job, she operates as a combination wet-worker and security blanket for the College of Engineering at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University's Daytona Beach campus.  Other hobbies include big data analysis, micromanging large projects, and teaching.





Thursday September 22nd, 2016
  Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) As A Service
  Justin Yapp - Ph.D. Candidate in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

UAV as a Service (UAVaaS) represents a ground-breaking concept that is pioneering the future of cloud computing within the domain of commercial UAVs.  This concept seeks to reduce the financial overhead that burdens companies who use UAVs for agriculture, surveillance, emergency response, inspections, survey and real estate.  Also addressed are privacy concerns with dat collection/ownership as well as efficient real-time sharing of information.

When implemented, UAVaaS acts as a cloud-orchestrated rental service for UAVs.  Companies now become multi-tenant operators in which they can connect to and timeshare  UAVs owned by different entities and fly them whenever needed.  This enables companies to only pay for the FAA registration, insurance and trained pilots.

Our Speaker: Justin Yapp is a recent Master of Science in Cybersecurity Engineering graduate from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.  He continues his academic research as a Ph.D. candidate in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and teaches part-time. His current research in UAV as a Service recently won the Best Paper award from the NATO Modelling and Simulation for Autonomous System Workshop held in Rome earlier this year, and another conference presentation of this topic is scheduled for the 35th Digital Avionics Systems Conference in September. Justin hopes to continue his research and aims to find funding to develop a test bed in which UAV as a Service can be developed on a small scale.




Thursday April 26th, 201
6

  April Student Presentation Night
  Members of the Teams in the Capstone Course and
Members of the Special Projects Laboratory

As we have done the last few years, our April meeting celebrated the accomplishments of our students. This is always a popular and entertaining topic, giving the students an opportunity to show off some impressive achievements.  In addition to presentations from teams in the capstone course and members of the Special Projects Lab, Abby Bulka and Nick Serle described their experiences with their entry in the 2015 AUVSI International RoboBoat competition, the S.S. Minnow. The competition had 16 international collegiate teams and required an unmanned surface vessel to navigate and perform numerous tasks autonomously.  Abby has a paper about the boat in the 2016 AUVIS autonomous vehicles conference.






Thursday March 24th, 201
6

  A Night of Potpourri with the Old Professor
Dr. Al Helfrick, Professor Emeritus at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Sticking with the style of "Tales of the Old Professor", Dr. Helfrick's presentation promises to be his usual eclectic mix.  The subjects will be historical, hysterical. and sometimes nostalgic but will have a connection to technology and in particular, aviation.  This is a presentation you don't want to miss as it most likely will become unscripted and cannot be repeated.

Our Speaker - Al Helfrick, is Professor Emeritus at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.  He started his career in radiation hardening of military systems, then after a military stint including a tour of duty in Viet-Nam, continued in the fields of cable television, test and measurements, avionics and finally as an independent consultant.  He joined ERAU in 1991 and retired in 2015 after serving as a professor and department chair.  He is still active in academia teaching for the University of Kansas and continues to publish and present papers at conferences.  His latest article appeared in the IEEE's Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society Magazine in late 2015.





Wednesday February 24th, 2016
  Overview of Cloud Computer
  Charles Chen co-founder and CEO  of Skymantics,LLC


Cloud computing is moving from meaningless buzz word to daily reality.  People have questions about the nature of the technology, and the control and security they will have over their data.  This talk will provide an overview of the challenges and benefits of this new technology, specifically as applied to the international aviation community's Next Generation Airspace mission.


Our Speaker - Charles Chen is a co-founder and CEO of Skymantics, LLC.  He is an expert in the area of System Wide Information Management (SWIM) research and development with a focus on the Flight Information Exchange Model (FIXM) and Flight Object concepts. He is an award-winning author of technical papers published in the Air Traffic Control Association (ATCA) Proceedings, Integrated Communications Navigation and Surveillance (I-CNS) conference, and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) testbeds.  Charles holds a Bachelors of Electrical and Computer engineering from Auburn University and a M.S. in Systems Engineering from Florida Institute of Technology.


Charles has worked in various testbeds such as the Florida NextGen Testbed, the Open Geospatial Consortium Interoperability Testbed, and the NASA Smart NAS Testbed. He has expertise in service oriente architecture with the use of Cloud infrastructure and platform applications to provide advisory and solution services to the FAA, Eurocontrol, NASA, and commercial aviation companies around the world.



              
 
Thursday January 28th, 201
6

  System Thinking: Apple Pie and the Sorcer's Apprentice
  Dr. Tony Hagar, Emery Riddle Aeronautical University


In today's increasingly globally connected world, complexities emerge that are being manifested in bizarre, unexpected, and potentially destructive ways.  Despite mankind's  awesome technical achievements, many of these unwelcome side effects are a result of what Herbert Simon calls "bounded rationality" - our human limitations on how we think.  This talk will illustrate this with some challenges of the past, inviting a little audience participation to have some fun.  We then discuss some of today's current issues and show how the science of systems thinking (not really new, perhaps just better organized) forms a framework  for grappling with the increasingly challenging issues emerging in our increasingly complex world.


Our Speaker - Dr. Tony Hagar's career has spanned over 5 decades with the federal government, the aerospace industry, and academia.  He served in the Air Force and later with the Central Intelligence Agency.  He worked on the Apollo Lunar program, and was the Mission Science Operations Team Chief for the Voyager Mission encounter at Saturn, receiving NASA awards for research, service and flight operations.  He spent a dozen years with the Institute for Defense Analyses doing research and analysis for the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and later as the Technical Director of its Systems Analysis Group.  He also served as the Chief  Space Technologist for the Venda/Veridoan Corp. and was an independent consultant before joining the ERAU facility in 2003. 





Thursday December,  3rd, 2015
  Engineering Ethics and What the IEEE Does for Us
  Walter Elden. PE (Retired)


Walter Eden  is a Life Senior Member of the IEEE and has been a member of the IEEE Society on Social Implications of Technology. During the 1990s  he served on the IEEE's Ethics Committee. From 1996 to 1998 Walter served on the IEEE Member Conduct Committee, now called the IEEE Ethics and Members Conduct Committee (EMCC).






Thursday, October 22, 201
5

  Science and Science Fiction:
Interdisciplinary Research Methods in the Humanities
  Ashly Lear Associate Professor of the Humanities at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University


For several years, Dr. Lear has been engaging students in science fiction through research in various technical fields.  This talk will explore some of her students' most innovative discoveries as they delve into what is possible from the realm of science fiction.

Speaker: Ashley Lear is an Associate Professor of the Humanities at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. She earned a B.A. in English from the College of William and Marym an M.A. in English from Wake Forest University, and a Ph.D. in English fro the University of Houston. Following her Ph.D. she spent a year at Georgia Tech as a Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellow, earning Postdoctoral Certifications in Digital Pedagogy and Technical Communication.  She has published articles on her creative digital assignments in Writing and the Digital Generation, and the College English Association Forum.  Her most recent book project, a comparative literary biography of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings and Ellen Glasgow, is under review at the University Press of Florida.  Her science fiction course includes guest lecturers fromvarious university disciplines and direct instruction in developing HTML projects.



 

Thursday, September 24, 201
5

The History and Growth of Modeling and Simulation
  Henry (Hank) Okraski, National Center for Simulation
President and Chief Executive Officer of Henry C. Okraski and Associates in Winter Park, Florida


The presentation visits some early designs of simulators - from crude attempts in World War I to the link Trainer, effectively used in World War II to train approximately 500,000 pilots.  The evolution of simulators from the primitive to the current highly complex devices is chronicled.  The expansion of simulation technology into many applications, such as medical, commercial airlines, space, defense, transportation, etc., is described through examples provided.

The growth of simulation technology in Florida is described with the economic impact of that growth discussed. Filling the career workforce pipeline is a serious challenge and the National Center for Simulation (NCS) is addressing the need by focusing on education, having developed a 4 year curriculum for high schools and instituting a Modeling and Simulation Certification for high school students.  Plans are outlined for expanding the certification from the 6 beta-test schools in Central Florida, accomplished in 2015, to a national offering.

Speaker: Henry (Hank) Okraski, National center for Simulation, is a simulation consultant for the modeling and simulation industry.  After 32 years of government service he retired and is President/Chief Executive Officer of Henry C. Okraski and Associates in Winter Park, Florida.

While with the Navy and a member of the Senior Executive Service, he was the Director of the Research and Engineering Department and the Deputy Technical Director of the Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division.  He has served on NATO Study Groups and received several awards including the Navy Meritorious Service Award and Navy Superior Service Award.  He was named Federal Engineer of the the Year by the National society of Professional Engineers.

He  is a founding member of the National Center for Simulation and continues to serve on the Board of Directors.  He chairs the Education and Workforce  Development Committee of NCS.  He led the task force in developing a for year high school curriculum in modeling and simulation.  He is a registered Professional Engineer (PE) and Certified Modeling and Simulation Professional (CMSP).  Formerly, adjunct faculty member of Rollins College and University of Central Florida.

Mr. Okraski has a Bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from Clarkson University in Potsdam, NY and a Master's degree in systems engineering from the University of Florida.  He received, and is proud of, the Golden Knight Award from Clarkson, the highest alumni award given by the university.






Thursday, April 23, 2015
Topic: ERAU Students Presentation on the Robotic Competition

We are closing out the spring dinner meetings with our traditional, and always popular, student presentation program.  This program lets ERAU and Volusia County students show off their research and competitive projects. This is a great place to give them practice presenting their work while getting the recognition their hard work deserves.

Students from the ERAU ECSSE capstone Team "Volt and Pepper"  will describe their design and experience competing in the IEEE SoutheastCon hardware competition in Ft. Lauderdale, FL.  The competition challenge required teams to create a small autonomous robot capable of operating an etch-a-sketch, rotating a Rubik's cube, playing a Simon Says toy, and a deck of cards.

IEEE Special Award winners from the Tomoka Region Science and Engineering Fair, Abigail Waltrath from Southwestern Middle School and Daphine Forester from Spruce Creek High School, will give a brief description of their projects and receive recognition fro their successful efforts.  Also, Abby Butka and team S.S. Minnow will present the results of last year's  RoboSub competition, and a preview of this year's RoboBoat competition.







Thursday, March 26, 2015
Topic: Locating and Tracking Aircraft in the World-Wide Airspace System
Speaker: Albert Helfrick PhD, Professor Embry-Riddle Aeronauticala University

The presentation will discus the development of aircraft locating and tracking systems frim the earliest systems to radar-based and later systems. The discussion will be of locating systems used for navigation, air traffic management and search and rescue.

Our speaker:

Albert Helfick, PhD is a retired department chair and professor at ERAU.  He also teaches short coiurses on avionics for the University of Kansas and is the author of 12 books.  He has been a member of the IEEE since 1963.  He has designed avionics systems for Cessna Aircraft.  Tel-Instrustment Electronics and has won the AIAA John Ruth award and the Radio Club of America Jerry Minter award for the contibutions to avionics.





Thursday, February 25th, 201
5

Topic: NASA Exploration System
Speaker: Anton Kiriwaus, NASA Kennedy Space Center

Since the close-out of NASA's Space Shuttle Program, there have been rumors of shutdowns, closings and an end to exploration.  On the contrary, NASA has been focused on a three-pronged approach to exploration under its aptly named Exploration Systems Development programs.  These programs are working together to enable the agency's to extend human existance beyond earth orbit for the first time since the Apollo program and beyond lunar orbit for the first time in history.

The first key to this is the crew vehicle, called Orion, which is being designed to support human exploration missions to multiple destinations in deep space.  Its versatile design is planned to allow it to safely carry and substain a crew of two to four for 21 days and can evolve to support a six-person crew on extended-duration missions The second key is an evolvable rocket, called the Spce Launch System, which will carry the Orion spacecraft as well as cargo and payloads to deep space. The second key is an evolvable rocket, called the Space Launch System, whic h will carry the Orion spacecraft as well as cargo and payloads to deep space.  Its lift capabilities are being designed to evolve from 70 metric tons up to 130 metric tons based on future mission requirements.  In its final enabler of the NASA Exploration Systems is the transformation of Kennedy Space Center into a 21st-centry spaceport with modern capabilities to launch spacecraft built and designed by both NASA amd private industry.  Currently in design and under construction are the pad and mobile launcher infrastructure as well as modular and flexible offline servicing systems for preparing the flight elements for launch.

OUR SPEAKER

Anton Kiriwas holds an M.S. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from University of Florida and M.S. and B.S. degrees in Computer Science from University of Central Florida.  He is currently an Electrical Engineer with NASA Kennedy Space Center.  He began his career working in modeling and simulation of the Space Shuttle system in support of launch processing at KSC while working for United Space Alliance.  He transitioned to civil service with NASA in 2009 to work supporting maintenance and sustaining engineering of the many pad and mobile launch platform electrical systems that were used for Space shuttle and Ares I-X  launches.  After the close out of the Space Shuttle program, Anton was the lead design engineer for the Thermal Control and Launch Release subsystem for Mobile Launcher of the Space Launch System (SLS).  In his current role, he now works for both the Orion, Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPVC) Program as the Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EGSE) integration lead as well as for the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) program as the team lead for the Electrical console in the Launch Control Center.  He and his team have just successfully completed EFT-1, the first test mission of the Orion, and are working towards the first test launch of the Space Launch System in 2018.





Thursday, January 22nd, 2014
Topic: TeachLivETM   A Mixed-Reality Teaching Environment
Speaker: Chrles E. Hughes, University of Central Florida

TeachLivETM is a mixed-reality teaching environment supporting teacher practice in classroom management pedagogy and content. TeachLiveETM Lab, developed at the University of Central Florida, is currently in use at 55 university campuses and four school districts in the United States.   Each partner utilizes TeachLivE in a unique manner depending on the needs of their students, teachers, professors, and community stakeholders. The system provides pre-service and in-service teachers the opportunity to learn new skills and to craft their practice without placing "real" students at risk during the learning process.  For more information visit teachlive.org.

Charles Hughes' research expertise is in virtual environments, with his current activity primarily involving human surrogates - virtual domain is focused on education and preparation of people for complex human-to-human interactions. The work with physical avatars focuses on situation awareness training and physical telepresence via robots and animatronics.  In addition to avatar-based research, Charlie also does work in cultural heritage and its use in helping young people understand the opportunities and challenges in STEM disciplines, and the connections of these disciplines to the arts and humanities.

OUR SPEAKER
Charles E. Hughes holds PhD and M.S. degrees in Computer Science and a B.A. degree in Mathematics.  He is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Central Florida (UCF).  He is also Co-Director of the Synthetic Reality Laboratory (SREAL), Professor in the School of Visual Arts & Design, a member of the university's Modeling & Simulation faculty, was honored as a Pegasus Professor in 2007 and a Dean's Research Professor in 2013.  He served on the faculities of Computer Science at Penn State University and the University of Tennessee prior to joining UCF in 1980.

Active research projects on which Charlie serves as a principal or co-principal investigator are funded by the Bill & Melida Gates Foundation, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Office of Naval Research (ONR).  Recently completed projects were funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Natinnal Endowment for the Humanities, the Army PEO-STRI, and the US Department of Veterans Affairs as well as NSF and ONR.




Thursday, December 4th, 2014
Topic: Rockin' Rockets with RF
Speaker: Jorge Torres, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Charged rocket plumes generally exceed the length of their source vehicles, and offer lightning a favorable path to ground. Rocket plumes enhance the induced transient currents in flight electronics, and increase the risk of vehicle failure. The affinity of lightning to the plume can be associated with the plume's electrical properties, which are coupled to plasma characteristics including the electron number density. However, the electron number density of rocket plumes is not well-known. In this study, the electron number density is characterized through data from static rocket firings.  A model of the plume in finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations also supports the results. Radio frequency and radar methodologies are used to characterize the plume as a dynamic component of an electrical system, supported by the construction of an RF apparatus that includes the design and manufacture of ultra-wideband antenna arrays.  The research estimates electron number density, but the data suggests other dynamic elements affect delay and attenuation of the radio signal 

OUR SPEAKER 

Jorge Torres is a student enrolled in Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University's (ERAU) Master of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering program.  He received his Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from the same university in 2012. He is currently works as a teaching assistant for the ERAU Electrical, Computer, Software, and Systems Engineering Department's capstone design course. Jorge's Master's thesis is titled, "Characterization of Electron Number Density in Rocket Exhaust Plumes through Microwave Transmissions," which involves extensive work with RF equipment, signal processing, plasma physics, and high power rocketry.  He has been a five-time intern for the space launch company, United Launch Alliance, participating in avionics, software, systems, manufacturing and launch operations groups.  Jorge also holds a National Association of Rocketry Level 2 High Power Rocket Certification.  In his practically nonexistent spare time, Jorge enjoys going to thrift stores with his fiancee to find old things to fix.  





Thursday, October 23rd, 201
4

Topics: Global Warming - From the Beginning
Speaker: Tracy Wichmann, Computer Programming Consultant


We worry a lot these days about global warming.  When the earth was formed it was ver y hot, like lava from a volcano.  There was very litttle oxygen in the atmosphere (mostly CO2). Over a period of about 4.5 million years it evolved until it now has a climate that supports life such as we enjoy. 

Climate changes are a natural phenomenon, a consequence of the earth (and moon's) motion relative to the sun.  There would be ice ages, temperature changing volcanic eruptions etc. as well as seasons.

Our Speaker: Tracy Wichmann received his Science Bachelor in Physics from MIT.  His education also included the study of Servomechanisms at Ohio State's Electrical Engineering Department and Astrophysics and Statistics and  System Engineering at UCLA.  He is a consultant for computer programming.  Over the years he had held positions as Program Manager, Senior Engineering Scientist, Research Engineer in such fields as electronic warfare, space shuttle avionics, air traffic control with such companies as Hughes Aircraft, Teledyne Systems, Litton Industries and the U.S. Air Force.  He has published over 50 papers and publications and has a patent on a blood pressure measuring device.  He held nnumerous positions in our section, the Florida Council, as well as CouthCon,. and currently serves as our section's Chairman.



 



Thursday, September 25th, 2014
Topics: Passive Radars using Ambient Illuminators
Speaker: Dr. William C. Barott, Associate Professor at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University 

Advances in signal processing over the last decade have generated a worldwide resurgence of interest in passive radars using ambient illuminators.  Altough computationally intensive, these radars are attractive for their small size and low cost.  Research at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University has led to several unique passive radar receivers.  Experimental demonstrations have shown aircraft tracking using signals from the XM Radio satellites, local areial survellance using a single antenna (moving toward "thumbstick" radars), and using RFID-style tags to embed communications signals within passive radar echoes.  In addition to experimental work, Dr. Barott's  group at ERAU uses simulated environments to study the effect of different scenarios on the survelliance performance of passive radars.  This talk with present an overview of these projects as well as present work and possiblilities for the future of passive radar.

Our speaker: Dr. William C. Barott is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering at Embry-Riddle Aeronauatical University and a 3-time graduate of Georgia Tech. His reseach focuses on RF systems to detect weak signals, including both passive radars and instruments for radio astronomy.  He has been researching passive radar since 2010 and was awarded a research fellowship to spend the summer of 2012 at Wright Patterson Air Force Base.  Billy is the student activities chair for the Dayatona section and also the advisor of the Embry-Riddle sstudent branch of the IEEE.  




Thursday, April 24, 2014
Topic: ERAU and B-CU Student Presentation on the Robotic Competition
Speaker: ERAU and B-CU Student Designers

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Bethune-Cookman University students will provide presentations on their robotic competition as well as senior projects.  The Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Senior Design team; also active IEEE members, designed and developed a robot to compete in the IEEE SoutheastCon Hardware competition The speakers for the presentation are Marc Latil, Evan Richardsson and Nicholas Antonio.  The remaining members of the team are Inacio Dias, Dominick Tournour, Leo Ghelarducci adn Carey Pfaff  Six if the seven members were first year IEEE students and new to the robotics side, leading to a large gain in engineering robotic experience. The goal of the competition was to design and construct a robot that navigates a course autonomously, acting as a basketball player.  The newest members of the IEEE at Bethune-Cookman University set out on a mission to partake in this years IEEE SoutheastCon Hardware Competition. In doing so they had the opportunity to gain an immense amount of knowledge and experience in engineering and all that it takes to construct a project from beginning to end.  The three speakers for this robot presentation will be Jennifer Jimenez, Kasongo Munza and Nabil Ahmed  The entire team consisted of the three people mentioned above.  Also student winners of the IEEE Daytona Section Special Awards at the 2014 Tomoka Region Science and Engineering Fair were reconized. The  Senior division winner Nicholas Ficher was from Spruce Creek High School and the Junior division winner Elizabeth Nami Pruitt was from Ormaond Beach Middle School.




 Thursday, March 27th, 2014
    Topic: Embry-Riddle's -  EcoCAR2
           Speaker: Chris Rowe 

EcoCar2 is a three year competition sponsored by the Department of Energy, General Motors, and Argonne National Laboratories.  The competition encompasses fifteen Universities across North America.  A 2013 Chevrolet Malibu is donated to each team where it is converted to an electric hybid vehicle.  EcoCAR 2 challenges students to reduce the Malibu's emissions, increase fuel economy and maintain consumer acceptability.  The mission of EcoCAR 2 is to educate  the next generation of automotive engineers through an unparalleled hands-on, real-world engineering experience.  The Embry-Riddle ECoCAR team is composed of Business, Communications, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering , and Mechanical Engineering majors.  These disciplines work together to design and convert a Plug-In Hybrid which consists of a battery pack, an electric motor to drive the wheels, and a generator coupled to a diesel engine to provide supplemental power to the batery pack and electric traction motor.  The car is currently in the early stages of operational testing and is being prepared for a final competition in June 2014.

Our speaker: Chris Rowe joined the Embry-Riddle EcoCAR 2 team in January 2013 as part of the electrical team, and is now serving as the the Electrical Lead while working on his Massters degree in Elecrical Engineering. Chris is responsible for leading the EcoCare 2 electrical team in the technical aspects of the electrical system in the Chevy Malibu.  This includes desgin, installation, and electrical troubleshooting for the low and high voltage systems on the EcoCAR.





Thursday, February 27/th, 2014

 Topic: Development of ERAU Minion Autonomous Surface Vehicle (ASV)
  Speaker: Tim Zuercher and Hitesh V. Patel

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University has been selected as one of three schools to represent the United States in the inaugural Maritime RobotX Challenge. This challenge requires teams to develop a fully-autonomous surface vehicle using a 16-foot high-performance Wave Adaptive Modular Vessel. The platform must accomplish multiple complex tasks autonomously, including buoy channel navigation, debris avoidance, docking, target identification and sonar localization. The system architecture consists of software nodes running in parallel to produce the complex behaviors required by the RobotX Challenge. These nodes include state estimation, health monitoring, object classification, map creation and trajectory planning. This method offers a robust and dynamic navigation solution capable of being applied to autonomous systems operating in multiple domains and not just those limited to maritime operations. This presentation discusses the development of the ERAU RobotX platform with a focus on addressing the challenges of autonomy, navigation, and propulsion in a maritime environment.

Our Speakers: Tim Zuercher holds a B.s. in Aerospace Engineering with a concentration in guidance, navigation and control. He is pursuing his M.S. and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering and has been an active member of the Robotics Association at Embry-Riddle (RAER) since the spring of 2012. Tim has designed embedded circuits and control systems for multiple autonomous vehicles and has been project lead on award winning international Aerial Robotics Competitions and intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition teams. Tim is currently the Control Systems Lead on the Embry-Riddle Maritime Robot-X Challenge ASV.

Hitesh V. Patel holds a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering with a concentration on propulsion systems.  He is currently pursuing his M.S. in Mechanical Engineering and has been an active member of RAER since the fall of 2010.  He has provided mechanical and electrical support for projects such as: RoboBoat, RoboSub, NASA Mining Competition, EcoCar 2, SAE Formula Hybrid and NASA Green Flight Challenge.  Hitesh is currently the Mechanical Systems Lead on the Embry-Riddle Maritime Robot-X Challenge ASV.





Thursday, January 23rd, 2014
 Topic: Quantum Information Systems and Adaptive Control
  Speaker: Dr. Mark Balas
                    
 Many control systems are inherently infinite dimensional when they are described by partial differential equations.  Currently there is renewed interest in the control of these kinds of systems especially in flexible aerospace structures and the quantum information field.  Since the dynamics of these systems will not be perfectly known, it is especially of interest to control these systems adaptively via low-order finite-dimensional controllers.  When systems are subjected to unknown internal delays, they are also fundamentally infinite-dimensional in nature.  In our work, we have developed direct model reference adaptive control and disturbance rejection with very low-order adaptive gain laws for large-scale finite dimensional systems as well as infinite-dimensional systems. 

This talk will focus on the effect of infinite dimensionality on the adaptive control approach. To illustrate the utility of the control law, The speaker will mention some some applications in partial differential equations for unstable linear diffusion and aerospace structures. Both then will go on and consider some issues in the control of quantum mechanical systems, in particular the Schrodinger wave equation and Dirac symmetric hyperbolic systems for relativistic fields.

These topics here may sound highly technical, maybe even forbidding, and to some extent they are.  But I hope to give you aversion of them that will be reasonably accessible and will still remain as exciting and attractive to you as they are to me. 

Our Speaker: Dr. Mark Balas is presently distinguished faculty in Aerospace Engineering at Embry-Ridddle Aerospace University.  He was the Guthrie Nicholson Professor of Electrical Engineering and Head of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Wyoming.  He has the following technical degrees: PhD in Mathematics, MS Electrical Engineering, MA Mathematics, and BS Electrical Engineering.  He has held various positions in industry, academia, and government.  Among his careers, he has been a university professor for over 35 years with RPI, MIT, University of Colorado-Bolder, and University of Wyoming, and has mentored 42 doctoral students.  He has over 300 publications in archive journals, refereed conference proceedings and technical book chapters.  He has been visiting faculty with the Institute for Quantum Information and the Control and Dynamics Division of the California Institute of Technology, the US Air Force Research Laboratory-Kirkland AFB, NASA
- Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the NASA Ames Research Center, and was the Associate Director of the University of Wyoming Wind Energy Research Center, and adjunct faculty with the School of Energy Resources.  He is a life follow of the IEEE.  Probably he will be most well known for the fact that his daughter Maggie is the prominent Denver drum and bass DJ known as Despise.






Thursday, December 5th, 2013
 Topic: Engineering for the Holidays
  Speaker: Daytona IEEE Section Members
 

Our Holiday meeting on December 5th is meant to be an enjoyable social get together with some light hearted presentations applying engineering principles and/or solutions st some holiday topics such as those presented below.

For the meeting, each member is encouraged to provide Jeanette Barott (barott@erau.edu) with a short summary for a brief (five minute) presentation on engineering the holidays.  Topics are along the lines of the following: Santa's Sleigh and NextGen, bioflourescence and Rudolph's nose, the micro-economics of elvish labor, traveling salesman and the three wise kings, green energy for holiday lights, etc.

Noteworthy presentations may be published in the January issue of the prestigious Engineering publication, SPARKS - Daytona Section Newsletter.  This could be a definite resume enhancement item.




Thursday, October 24th, 2013
 Topic: Reverse Engineering Beer
  Speaker: Ann-Marie Bays
Owner of Craft Beverage Sales and Marketing

Our talk will be about some of the work of Dr. Pat McGovern, a Biomolecular Archeologist at the University Of Pennsylvania Museum. Dr. McGovern proposes the argument that the fermentation of alcoholic beverages played a major role in human evolution and the development of civilization. Over the past two decades she has pioneered the emerging field of Molecular Archaeology and her endeavors of late have focused on the organic analysis of vessel contents and dyes, particularly Royal Purple, wine and beer.  The work she has done in the reverse engineering of beer found in the tomb of King Midas is responsible for making possible the formation of the recipe Dogfish Head Brewing uses for their beer called Midas Touch. At the end of our talk we will have the opportunity to sample some of the beers resulting from Dr. McGovern' work. 

Our Speaker

Ann-Marie Bays Ann-Marie is the owner of Craft Beverage Sales and Marketing, a company that does brand management, marketing and promotion throughout the state of Florida for Craft Breweries and importers. Her clients include Boulder Beer Company, Southern Tier Brewing, Abita Brewing, Anchor Brewing and Eurobre Imports.  Ann-Marie's beer credential include work throughout the home brew community and the local beer culture.  She is a Certified Cicerone as well as a Recognized BJCP Beer and Mead Judge with experience judging several competitions most notably Sunshine Challenge, Best Florida Beer Championship and Deland Craft Beer Festival.  She is also an active organizer for the highly successful Deland Craft Beer Week and Deland Craft Beer Festival.

In addition to her extensive beer knowledge and understanding, Ann-Marie is an accomplished photographer with a degree from the Southeast Center for Photographic Studies with a commercial focus on glass, reflective surface and beverage photography.  Ann-Marie also has 12 years of experience running her own company specializing in design and marketing for small businesses.






Thursday, September 26th, 2013
 Topic: Methods for Encouraging Computer Literacy and Programming Skills
  Speaker: Dr. Keith Garfield and Ms. Hiranya Mir
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Dr. Keith Garfield and Ms. Hiranya Mir will do a presentation on methods for encouragaing computer literacy and programming skills.  including a discussion of computer literacy in the modern era and challenges to assumptions of computer literacy based on age, ethnicity, and gender.  A case study on a summer program for middle school girls will be presented, as well as scholarly research and sample practice assignments for adults for non-technical backgrounds.

Our Speaker

Dr. Garfield is an associate professor at ERAU, teaching the formal mathematics and formal representations necessary to pursue software and computer engineering disciplines.  Dr. Garfield also teaches courses discussing the underlying nature of computer programming languages, software engineering processes, and modeling and simulation techniques.  Prior to his appointment at ERAU, Dr. Garfield worked as an engineer performing structural analysis on space flight hardware with McDonnell-Douglas, as an engineer on the shuttle payload integration team at the Kennedy Space Center, and as a researcher at the Institute for Modeling and Simulation at the University of Central Florida.  Dr. Garfield's current research activities include participating in experiments for the FAA's Next Generation Airspace program, creating artificial intelligent agents that interact with humans in natural ways, and using fuzzy logic to study complex s systems behavior.

Hiranya Mir is a recipient of the NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Award and a sophomore in Computer Science at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. She is passionate about bringing different groups of people into the field of Information Technology.



Thursday, April 25, 2013
 Topic: Student Presentations
  Speaker: Student Representatives of
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Bethune-Cookman University

Each year the April meeting is usually dedicated to the activities of the young engineers studying Engineering in our local Colleges and Universities.  This year students from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Bethune-Cookman University will do  the presentations.  They will report on their recent robotic competition as well as senior projects.

In addition the student winners of the IEEE Daytona Section Special Awards at the 2013 Tomoka Region Science and Engineering Fair will be introduced and recognized.





Thursday, March 28, 2013
 Topic: Cyber Security and Privacy
  Speaker: Remzi Seker
   Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer, Software and System Engineering
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University  

Wide availability of computers and the connectivity that comes with them provide services that have become an integral part of our lives. Connectivity has quickly evolved into being an essential infrastructure element on which our society relies for business as well as maintaining quality of life. Rapid evolution of technology and its penetration into our society brings forth various challenges, privacy being a prominent one. This talk will survey some privacy issues and the impact of involuntary disclosure of personal information with examples. The speaker will also provide examples of how data is collected from users and the potential long-term impact of such practices. The speaker will also present some measures which could help users protect their information.


Remzi Seker:  is a Professor in the Department of Electrical, Computer, Software, and Systems Engineering in Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. His research interests are safety and security critical systems and computer forensics. One of Dr. Seker’s research interests focuses on ways to address the asymmetric threats that arise from rapid, yet necessary use of technology. Dr. Seker is the co-author of one of the first papers that was published on Mobile Phishing and possible techniques for preventing it.  He serves on ACM and IEEE Computer Society Computing Curriculum: Computer Science 2013 (CS2013) Committee. Dr. Seker has been actively involved in educating the general public as well as legal professionals in the area of security and privacy. He has been interviewed multiple times by various TV stations and magazines on matters regarding cyber security. Dr. Seker served as a US Department of Homeland Security Software Assurance (SwA) Forum Working Group member. He is a Senior Member of IEEE and he serves as associate editor for Electrical Engineering and Computers and the Journal of Cyber Security and Mobility.



                                   

Thursday, January 24, 2013
 Topic: Experience from IEEE Humanitarian Work
  Speaker: Percy "Butch" Shadwell
   International Chairman of the IEEE Humanitarian Technology Challenge - Reliable Electricity
Principal Consultant - Shadwell Technical Services
  
                         
In 2009 at a special meeting at the National Academy of Science Butch Shadwell was elected the international chair of the IEEE Humanitarian Technology Challenge - Reliable Electricity Solution Team. Their charge was to donate their time and talent toward finding better ways to apply technology to alleviate human suffering in the world. He lead the development of an experimental power system with many unique features for this problem domain. He has installed prototypes in Nicaragua and Kenya on four trips abroad. He will review the project and experiences from this humanitarian work.

Speakers: Percy "Butch" Shadwell has been working in electronics since he was 12 years old.  Starting with vacuum tube technology, he has designed systems through the evolution of transistors, SSI, MSI, and LSI.  In this extraordinary career he has worked with almost every kind of technology in the electronics industry.  Including advanced R&D in nuclear medicine, opto-electronics, electronic warfare, robotics, industrial automation, machine vision, artificial intelligence, digital television, special sensors and embedded microcontrollers.

A senior member of the IEEE, for the last twenty years Mr. Shadwell has been authoring the Brain Teaser Challenge, a monthly humorous column with a technical challenge inside. It is published in a number of IEEE newsletters and magazines worldwide. Readers are encouraged to send in their answers.


He has conducted sponsored research at Carnegie-Mellon Robotics Institute and received over $1.5 million in grants for his work in machine vision.  For the past ten years he has had a successful consulting practice developing new technologies for over a dozen companies.  His clients include multi-billion dollar companies, and as an active volunteer in IEEE has been a featured speaker at many universities, sections, and student branches around Region 3 and Jamaica.  In 2009 he was selected as the international chair of the Humanitarian Technology Challenge - Reliable Electricity.



                      
Thursday, January 24, 2013, IEEE Dinner Meeting
 Topic: Electric Propulsion
  Speaker: Susan Allen, PhD.
   Associate Dean for Research,
College of Engineering, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
The presentation will be by Dr. Susan Allen who is the new Associate Dean for Research at the College of Engineering at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.  Her work has focused largely on laser/material interactions, with an early emphasis on laser chemical vapor deposition and some novel laser machining. She has worked on laser cleaning of surfaces, including particle removal and laser induced desorption and their underlying mechanisms and, more recently, on laser sensor development and photocatalytic disinfection of bacteria.  The presentation promises to be very informative and will give all a chance to meet Dr. Allen.

Speakers: Dr. Susan Allen has more than 150 scientific and engineering publications, many presentations to professional societies and other groups and nine U.S. patents.  She has served on advisory panels for the National Science Foundation, the National Academy of Sciences and was appointed to the President's Committee for the National Medal of Science.  Currently, Dr. Allen is serving as the Associate Dean for Research for the College of Engineering at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. 

Professor Allen is active in the Materials Research Society, the Optical Society of America, the American Vacuum Society and is a Senior Member of IEEE and a Fellow of SPIE.  Her previous university administration appointments include: Director of Arkansas Center for Laser Applications and Science at Arkansas State University, Vice Chancellor for Research and Academic Affairs at Arkansas State University, Vice President for Research at Florida State University and Dean of the Graduate School at Tulane University.




Saturday, December 1, 2012, IEEE Technical Meeting
 Topic: Electric Propulsion
Speaker: Jianhua Liu, PhD. Associate Professor
  Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University


With the rapid advancement in areas such as high energy/power density batteries, fast charging stations, and high efficient motors and motor controllers, ground electric vehicles (GEV) have gradually becoming a reality while air electric vehicles (AEV) are rising from the horizon. What is common in both GEV and AEV is the energy storage system and the power train system, jointly referred to as the electric propulsion system. To educate students of the College of Engineering at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in this exciting area, we plan to offer a new class titled "Electric Propulsion" for both undergraduate students and graduate students. This presentation will shed some lights of this class. First, we give a brief account of the history of electric propulsion. Then, we list the pros and cons of the electric propulsion system as compared to other systems. Next, we introduce the main contents of the course, including batteries, battery management, battery charging, various motor technologies and matching motor controllers, choosing appropriate technologies to suit different applications, and system integration. Finally, we present an example of electric propulsion system which
can be
used for both GEV and AEV.

Speakers: Jianhua Liu received a PhD degree in Electrical Engineering (with a minor in Statistics) from the University of Florida in 2004. From August 2004, he has been a faculty member in the Department of Electrical, Computer, Software, and Systems Engineering at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach campus, where he is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. His areas of research interests include wireless communications, signal processing, sensor networks, and electric propulsion.


Thursday, October 25th, 2012, IEEE Dinner Meeting
 Topic: Birds of Prey
Speaker: Ms. Gina Holt, Wild Abouth Birds, Inc.


Gina Holt is dedicated to a special kind of bird called a "Raptor" - a bird of prey.  Raptors include hawks, owls, kestrels, osprey and eagles.  They are an integral part of our ecology, particularly here in central Florida.  In addition to giving us insights into how they live, mate, nest and hunt she will bring two of her specimens; a barred Owl and a red shouldered hawk.  She will also cover their adaptations, food chain, habitats, conservation and the environment.

Speakers: Ms. Gina Holt, a raptor rehabilitator and environmental educator.  She has been involved in bird rescue and rehabilitaion for over ten years and providing environmental education classes with live birds for the last five. The rescue of her first raptor was a life-changing event for her. She decided she wanted to work closely with raptors.  She first volunteered and then became a staff member at the Audubon Center for Birds of Prey in Maitland, Florida.  About five years ago she started her company, Wild About Birds, Inc.  dedicated to environmental education, conservation and preservation of haviats for the benefit of Florida's birds and other wildlife.



Thursday, September 27th, 2012, IEEE Dinner Meeting
 Topic: Fossils of Nova Road - The Story of the Ground Sloth and the Mastodon
Speaker: James "Zach" Zacharias Senior Curator of Education and Curator of History
Daytona Museum of Arts and Sciences


Join Zach Zacharias and learn about the Prehistoric animals that roamed this area during the last ice age. Daytona Beach and the area around Nova Road was a hotbed of animals like the Giant Ground Sloths, Mastodons and Mammoths.  Several years ago during a graveling operation the bones of a number of South American Giant Ground Sloths were found near the corner of Reed Canal Road and Nova Road.  Last year during the evacuation of a retention pond in Holly Hill, near the corner of Mason and Nova Roads, the remains of an Ice Age Mastodon was unearthed.  Zach will talk about these discoveries, the evacuation of the fossils, the significance of these finds, and the preservation of the remains.  He will also bring along some of the fossilized bones, from these evacuations, for closer inspection.

Speakers: The Guest Speaker for the September Meeting will be James "Zach" Zacharias a graduate of Florida State University and currently serves as the Senior Curator of Education and Curator History at the Museum of Arts and Sciences in Daytona Beach Florida.




Thursday, April 24th, 2012, IEEE Dinner Meeting
 Topic: Student Report on the Robotic Competition at SouthestCon2012
Speaker: Members of the ERAU and BCU Student Robotic Teams


At the beginning of the Fall Semester in 2011 teams of students from the Engineering and Computer Science Departments at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Bethune-Cookman University began the development of robots designed to compete at the Robotic Competition at SoutheastCon 2012.  These robots were required to meet very stringent design rules and had to be capable of operating in an autonomous mode over a challenging course. Each of the student teams designed, constructed and programed their robots over the winter in order to meet the March 15th Deadline.  On March 15th and 16th the ERAU and BCU teams competed with robotic teams from approximately 40 Universities and Colleges representing the major engineering schools in the Southeast Region of the United States.

Speakers: Members of ERAU's and BCU's Robotic Teams. The members of each robotic team will explain the design of their robot, and indicate the engineering techniques they employed to make their robots competitive.  Finally they will demonstrate the actual robot hardware.  The development and construction process, necessary to build these machines, has required a great amount of time and energy from these students, and I know the people attending the meeting will enjoy their efforts.   





Tuesday, March 22nd, 2012, IEEE Dinner Meeting
 Topic: The University of Central Florida Business Incubuation Program
Speaker: Management from the UCFBIP


Since its founding in October 1999 the UCF Business Incubation Program (UCFBIP) has helped more than 200 emerging companies (including over 110 current clients) create over $500 million in annual revenue and more that 1600 new jobs wiht an average salary of $50,000.  With nine opened current locations across 5 counties in Central Florida,  the Business Incubation Program is a collaboration in economic development between UCF, Orange County, the City of Orlando, Seminole County, the City of Winter Springs, Lake County, the City of Leesburg, the City of Sanford, Osceola County, the City of St. Cloud, the City of Kissimmee, Volusia County and the Florida High Tech Corridor Council.

The UCF Business Incubator - Daytona Beach International Airport is UCFBIP's ninth incubator.  The incubator opened July 27, 2011, in an effort to assist high growth companies in Volusia County.  The incubator is a mixed use incubator and will house all kinds of companies except for retail.  

The 8,000 square foot facility is located at the US Customs terminal at the Daytona Beach International Airport.  It has a very modern style, and is able to house approximately 20 companies depending upon how many offices each company requires for operation.  The first client has already moved in and many other companies are currently being reviewed for entry to the UCF Business Incubaion Program.




Tuesday, February 28th, 2012, IEEE Dinner Meeting

 Topic: Volusia County Hospice Operations
Speaker: Cathy Gallagher, RN

Halifax Health Center Hospice Liaison Nurse Cathy Gallagher, RN will present an overview of the Volusia County Hospice operations, how it is accessed, what it does, its staff and equipment and its record of success. This includes not just how  it interfaces with the patient but how it works with and relates to the family and loved ones.

Cathy Callagher  was born and educated in New York State.  In 1976 she came to Florida to attend Flagler College in St. Augustine.  When she graduated she decided to stay in Florida because it is nice and warm.  In 1999 she decided to become a Registered Nurse.  While in Nursing School (1996-1999) she worked as a CNA for Hospice.  After graduating from Nursing School, she worked for 2 years as an RN in the Oncology Department of Halifax Health.  In 2001 she rejoined the Hospice Program at Halifax Health as an Admissions Nurse.  For the past nine years, she has worked as a Community access Liaison which allows her to reach out and teach others about the benefits and helpfulness of hospice.  Cathy is certified in hospice and palliative care nursing.



             Thursday,  January 19th, 2012, IEEE Sectional Dinner Meeting

    Topic: The History of Navigation - Part 2
Speaker: Tracy Wichmann

Part two describes the change in the history of navigation with the invention of the marine chronometer.  Early navigators used the stars, the winds, the currents and visual references to find destinations.  With the development of the marine chronometer navigators could obtain rather precise measurements of their longitudinal location anywhere on the surface of the earth.. .During his lecture he will describe how the escapement mechanism in these chronometers evolved to allow precision measurements to be made over extended periods of time.

Tracy Wichmann has a diverse resume.  He received his Science Bachelor in Physics from MIT.  His education also included the study of Servomechanisms at Ohio State’s Electrical Engineering Department and Astrophysics and Statistics and System Engineering at UCLA.  He is an Adjunct Professor at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University and consultant for computer programming.  Over the years he had held positions as Program Manager, Senior Research Scientist, Research Engineer in such fields as electronic warfare, space shuttle avionics, air traffic control with such companies as Hughes Aircraft, Teledyne Systems, Litton Industries, and the U.S. Air Force.  He has published over 50 papers & publications and has a patent on a blood pressure measuring device.  He has been past Chairman and Treasurer of the Daytona Section and currently serves as our Vice Chairman.  He is also a member of the Southcon Board of Directors.





Thursday,  November 29th, 2011 IEEE Sectional Dinner Meeting
 Topic: Current Topics on the Volusia County Council
Speaker: Frank Bruno, Chairman Voulsia County Council


Frank Bruno will speak on his experience as the Volusia County Council Chairman and what has transpired during his term in this position.  He will also comment and provide his observations on the proposed Sun Rail System.

Frank Bruno after competing his active duty in the United States Military, opened a print shop in Port Orange.  This venture was very successful, and he sold it to entered politics.  Over the last four years Frank has served as the chairman of the Volusia County Council.  He currently serves on the transportaiton commission which overseas Sun Rail.  Mr. Bruno will be stepping down, at the end of this current term, due to term limits.


Thursday,  October 27th, 2011 IEEE Sectional Dinner Meeting
 Topic: Sterotactic Radio Surgery
(Gamma Knife Treatment; CyberKnife Treatment)

Speaker:
Dr. Brad Factor

Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) is a technique to treat brain disorders. It uses a highly focused beam of radiation to target specific areas of the brain. The beam of radiation destroys the tissue that a doctor would otherwise have removed with a scalpel during an operation.

Dr. Brad Factor: Dr. Brad Factor is Board Certified by the American Board of Radiology in Radiation Oncology and he has interests in treating all cancer sites. Dr. Factor joined Halifax Health after serving as an Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology at the H. Lee Cancer Institute and Research Centers. He is interested in applying new techniques and treatments in the field of radiation oncology, such as stereotactic radiosurgery, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT). 





Thursday,  September 22th, 2011 IEEE Sectional Dinner Meeting
Topic: The Accuracy of Weather Forcasts
Speaker: Dr. Christopher Herbster

Weather forecasting, which historically has been notoriously inaccurate, has substantially improved over the last 50 years. Computers and the mathematical modeling of weather patterns is a substantial factor in this improvement. Satellites have also provided a global view of cloud cover and moisture content. Doppler radar gives current data on wind and rain activity. The net result is that the accuracy of the forecasts has dramatically improved. Moreover the precision of warning time, strength and place, of these predictions is strongly related to the size of the meteorological event. Thus hurricanes can be precisely tracked, but tornados are predictable only within a general area. Small squalls, thunder storms and supercells can only be predicted within less than an hour. Fortunately we have doppler radar to give some form of warning about such events.

Dr. Christopher HerbsterDr. Christopher Herbster, Professor of Meteorolog, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University





Thursday,  April 28th, 2011, IEEE Sectional Dinner Meeting
Topic: Student Report on the Robotics Competition
Speaker: ERAU and BC-U Student Robotics Teams


On  March 17th - 20th,  2011 a Robotics Competition was held as part of SoutheastCon 2011.  This is an annual conference in which about 40 Colleges and Universities, from all over the South Eastern portion of the United States, compete.  This year the Daytona Area was represented by a robotics team from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, and for the first time a robotics team from Bethune-Cookman University. The scenario in which the robots must perform was specified several months before the contest.  The robotics teams  then build their robots to operate in the specified venue and respond according to what was discovered.  The robots must operate autonomously and rely strictly on on-board sensors and processors to discover and react appropriately to obstacles discovered during the competitive runs.  At the April Section meeting members of each of Daytona's competing robotics teams  will give a short report on the robot that they designed for the competition and some of the lessons learned from the experience.

Student Robotics Teams Members of the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Bethune-Cookman University will each describe the design and characteristics of their robots, what their robot encountered during the tests,  and how well their robots performed in the competition.



Thursday,  March 24th, 2011, IEEE Sectional Dinner Meeting
Topic:
The History of Naviagation - Part 1
Speaker:
Tracy Wichmann

Part one meaning before the invention of the marine chronometer.  How early navigators used the stars, the winds, the currents and visual references to find destinations.  How ancient boat design reveals navigation methods and how the Chinese may have discovered America before Columbus.

Tracy Wichmann has a diverse resume.  He received his Science Bachelor in Physics from MIT.  His education also included the study of Servomechanisms at Ohio State’s Electrical Engineering Department and Astrophysics and Statistics and System Engineering at UCLA.  He is an Adjunct Professor at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University and consultant for computer programming.  Over the years he had held positions as Program Manager, Senior Research Scientist, Research Engineer in such fields as electronic warfare, space shuttle avionics, air traffic control with such companies as Hughes Aircraft, Teledyne Systems, Litton Industries, and the U.S. Air Force.  He has published over 50 papers & publications and has a patent on a blood pressure measuring device.  He has been past Chairman and Treasurer of the Daytona Section and currently serves as our Vice Chairman.  He is also a member of the Southcon Board of Directors.



Wednesday,  February 23rd, 2011, IEEE Sectional Dinner Meeting
Topic:
The da Vinci Surgical Robotic System
Speaker:
Micah (Mike) Blackmon MD 

The presentation will describe the da vinci surgical technique, a Robotic Surgery System for many surgical procedures including gynecologic oncology procedures, general gynecologic procedures and prostate procedures.  The surgeron sits at a console about 15 feet from the anesthetized patient who is positioned on the surgical table.  The console is comproised of a video screen, hand controls and foot pedals.  The da Vinci system employs two cameras to provide a 3-D color image of the operating field, plus five to 10 times magnification for a very precise view.  Next to the surgical table is the bedside cart with four arms, three for instruments and one for a camera.  The arms can be equipped with various instruments and rotate like a hand and wrist.  The da Vinci system translates the surgeon's motions into tiny movements and corrects for any hand tremors or extra hand motion.  This allows for xomplex surgeries with small incisions, thus revolutionizing minimally  invasive surgery and explanding the types of surgeries sthat can be performed.

Micah (Mike) Blackmon, MD is with the Halifax Health Center for Urology will be our speaker for the evening.. He is a native Floridian having been born and raised here and he received his MD from the University of Miami. He performed his residency at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta, GA. He is board certified.





Thursday,  January 20th, 2011, IEEE Sectional Dinner Meeting
Topic:
The Marine Science Center at Ponce Inlet - Overview

Speaker:
Michael Brothers, Director of the Marine Science Center

The presentation will describe the work of the Marine Science Center and some of the unique characteristics of the species that center supports.  It promises to be an interesting and informative presentation for all.

Michael Brothers is the Director of the Marine Science Center at Ponce Inlet.  He has a long history of the study of marine animals, birds and sea creatures.  The presentation will be describe the work of the Marine Science Center and some of the unique characteristics of the species that center supports.  It promises to be an interesting and informative presentation for all.




Tuesday,  December 7, 2010 i IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic: Reducing Energy Consumption - What can you do?
How does power factor work into this solution?

Speaker: David Wise and Roy Mailsoff

America has a great thirst for energy.  We need  energy to maintain lifestyles that we have become accustomed to.  There are ways to reduce consumption by minimizing and optimizing usage and by different technologies.  These will be discussed from a research and operational perspective.

What is Power Factor? How can it impact your electrical system and energy usage? There are many different technologies competing for a place amongst those systems that need to be considered, so you may meet your energy goals, and several will be discussed.  Having useful information about what to consider when looking at energy conservation is important to establish baseline reviews to determine what is most beneficial to you.

David Wise is the Vice President of Production and Technology, KVAR Energy Savings, Inc.  He has held numerous electronics engineering technology positions in the manufacturing sector.  He brings considerable products certification management capabilities and experience.  Mr. Wise is also recognized as the inventor on seven US patents.

Roy Mailsoff after attending the University of Oregon and Hofstra began working at his family's commercial real estate and land development in Chicago, Illinois.  It was in Chicago while maintaining commercial real estate properties that Mr. Mainsoff realized the urgency for energy conservation and awareness.  In 2007, Mr. Malisoff met with KVAR Energy Savings, Inc (KVAR) CEO, Steve Fish, and learned about power factor optimization through the use of patented technology licensed to KVAR.  Thereafter, Mr. Malisoff relocated to Daytona Beach, Florida, where KVAR manufactures energy saving devices called KVA Energy Controllers (KVAR ECsTM)..





Thursday, October 28, 2010 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic:  Calibrating Speed Detection Devices for
Extended Applications: LIDAR and Radar

Speaker: Dr. Brian Butka and Will Gaughan

Speed detection devices and commonly used by law enforcement agencies to determine the instantaneous speed of vehicles.  However, in civil engineering applications there is a need to measure the acceleration and deceleration of vehicles in addition to the instantaneous vehicle speed.  This talk will discuss the principles of operation of both LIDAR and RADAR speed methods that can be used to calibrate the devices.  Calibration of LIDAR devices  requires generating pulses with extremely precise timing delays, this talk will detail W ill Gaughan's solution to this problem using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA).

Dr. Brian Butka is an associate professor in Electrical, Computer, Systems and Software Engineering at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University.  Dr. Butka has previously taught Electrical Engineering in the United Sates Naval Academy and has over  20 years of industrial experience in the mixed-signal design of custom integrated circuits.  Dr. Butka's research  interests include avionics and control for autonomous vehicles (primarily rotary wing) and the design and verification of safety-critical hardware.  Dr. Butka is currently collaborating with Dr. Barott of ERAU on a bi-static radar project

Will Gaughan is a graduate student pursuing the new Masters in Electrical and Computer Engineering.. Will graduated in May 2010 with a BS in Electrical Engineering with a Systems Engineering emphasis.  He is currently working on a bisatic radar project with Drs. Butka and Barott.  In his spare time Will has been known to play guitar and sing at local nightspots and restaurants.




Thursday, September 23, 2010 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic:  Trajectory Generation and Cooperative Control of Mobile Robots
with Kinematic Constraints
Speaker: Jing Wang, PhD

Complex networked cyber-physical dynamical systems are everywhere in our real life. Examples include small-scale air, water and ground-based autonomous vehicle systems, sensor networks, VLSI circuits, computer network, Internet and so on. Yet complex networked cyber-physical systems pose new challenges because they are extremely dynamic, unreliable and large-scale, and traditional approaches based on centralized control may not be applicable. Recent years have witnessed the extensive development on the cooperative control design of networked systems. In this talk, a near-optimal real time trajectory generation method for mobile robots with kinematic constraints is first presented. Then, after a brief review of the basic idea of designing linear cooperative control, a new reactive cooperative formation control design for a class of dynamical systems with collision avoidance capability will be reported. As design examples, the applications to the cooperative control of nonholonomic chained systems and cooperative control based teleoperation with high latency will be discussed. Simulation results and some elementary experimental results will also be provided.

Jing Wang received his Ph.D. degree in control theory and control engineering from South University, China in 1007.  He was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Institute of Computing Technology , Chinese Academy of Sciences, from 1997 to 1999, and at the National University of Singapore, from 1999 to 2002.  From 2002 to 2007, he was with School of Electrical and Computer Science of University of Central Florida as a Research Assistant Professor.  Science 2007, he has been an Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Computer Engineering at Bethune-Cookman University.  His main research interests include Robot Control, Cooperative Control of Multi-Robots, Control of Nonholonomic Systems, Visual Servoing, Distributed Optimization, Distributed Sensor Networks, Nonlinear Control of Energy Systems.  Recenty, Dr. Wany was awarded an NSF Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) grant.  He is a Member of the IEEE.





Thursday, April 29, 2010 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic:  Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Students Branch,
2010 Robotic Competition Report Presentation
Speaker: Members of the ERAU Robotics Team

In March of 2010 a team from the IEEE Student Branch of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University  (ERAU) attended the 2010 IEEE Southeast Conference in Charlotte, North Carolina.  The purpose of the trip was to participate in a Robotics Competition held in conjunction with SoutheastCon 2010.  The event involved competition between solar powered autonomously controlled vehicle designed and developed by a number of technical colleges and universities throughout the Southeast portion of the United States.

The ERAU students built a robot that from a completely discharged state was required to charge the vehicle using solar power and autonomously race around an obstacle course.  Each competitive vehicle had to charge and then complete as much of the obstacle course as possible within the 3 minute time limit. The ERAU team placed second of all the teams competing in the special competition ladder. They were limited to competing in the special ladder as they had one member of their team who was a postgraduate student.

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Students Branch, 2010 Robotic Competition Team were the speakers for the evening. Several members of the ERAU Robotics Team will described the process taken to conceive, design, build, and test their robot, the results of the competition, as well  the experiences gained and lessons learned.  A live demonstration of the robot in action will be presented.




March 25th, 2010 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic: Small Radio Telescope Program Review
Speaker: Charles R. Husbands and Dr. Hugh Ward


In 2007 Dr. Hugh Ward and Dr. Jane Owen prepared a proposal to the IEEE Life Members Committee to fund a Small Radio Telescope (SRT) for educational purposes. It was proposed to use the SRT to teach Radio Astronomy, Electronics and Data Processing in the local schools, and for College and University Research projects.  Grant funds were received from the IEEE Life Members Fund, hardware was ordered and assembly began in late 2008.  The first phase of the program, Assembly and Testing, took place between September 2008 and February 2009.  The second phase of the program, the Installation and Testing of the SRT, at the planetarium of the Museum of Arts and Sciences in Daytona Beach Florida occurred between February and May of 2009.  Due to flooding in the Planetarium at the Museum in May 2009 a third phase of the program, to install a wireless data link from the Planetarium to the Museums Auditorium was undertaken. This link allowed the SRT to be operated and displayed in either the Planetarium or the Auditorium. The development phase of this program was completed in December 2009.

At the present time there are two additional phases in the SRT development program underway.  One is the implementation of the hardware and software necessary to permit the SRT to be operated remotely over the internet.  In addition an educational program is underway, under the direction of Dr. Ward. This program involves the design of processing software and lesson plans that will permit the SRT to be used within the museum and our local school system for age appropriate education.  The current status of these programs will be reviewed and on how we envision the SRT being used in near future will be discussed.
 
Charles R. Husbands holds a Masters Degree in Electrical Engineering and a Masters Degree in Engineering Management.  He has been a practicing engineer for over 40 years and is a Senior Life Member of the IEEE.  In 1996 he retired from the MITRE Corporation where he directed a research group in fiber optic technology.  In retirement he formed Blackhorse Communications a   private consulting company specializing in optical and microwave communications.  He has published and lectured extensively on optical networks and communication systems and holds a number of patents in this area.  He is currently the Project Manager for the Daytona Section’s Small Radio Telescope Program.





February 25th, 2010 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic: Road Mapping Automotive Electronics
Speaker: Ron Gedney

Among the 26 chapters in the INEMI roadmap is the "Product Emulator" for Automotive Products.  The Roadmap has consistently predicted that electronics will become 30% to 40% of the manufacturing cost of an automobile!! There is an on-going dramatic increase in the use of electronic systems to enable better performance, handling and reliability in the automobile.  Today's car depends on "drive-by-wire" technologies for steering, braking and handling.  We are beginning to see the use of radar systems for "blind spot" management, parking, lane changing, driving while impaired, or falling asleep at the wheel.  Manufacturers are introducing new systems that will allow the driver to view internal and external information such as temperature and humidity; hands-free communication and entertainment systems; GPS travel directions/maps; tolling, and more.  Hybrid vehicles are being introduced with voltages ranging from 42V to 500V.  Some of these systems will be discussed as well as new technologies that are yet to come.


Ron Gendney was V.P. Operations and Chief Technical Officer for the International Electronics Manufacturing Initiative (iNEMI) and was responsible for the development and publication of the item biannual Roadmap.  He retired from iNEMI at the end of 2002 (although continued to be involved with several of ongoing projects on a consulting basis).  He joined the consortium in 1996, bringing with him nearly 40 years experience in the development, manufacturing and procurement of electronic components and electronics packaging.

Mr. Gedney has several patents in electronic packaging and has authored or co-authored numerous technical articles, several book chapters and co-edited a book on lead-free electronics.  He is past president of the IEEE Components Packaging and Manufacturing Technology (CPMT) Society, past General Chairman of the IEEE/EIA-sponsored Electronic Components and Technology Conference, past chairman of the CMPT Binghamton chapter, a Fellow of the IEEE and an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Electronics Packaging Manufacturing.  In 1999 Mr. Gedney was the recipient of the IEEE CMPT Society's David Feldman Outstanding Contribution Award.  He was presented with the IEEE third Millennium Medal in 2000.  He received the SolderTec Global Lead-free Solder Award in 2004 " in recognition of his leadership and technical expertise in eliminating lead from electronic assemblies".  He graduated from Tufts University with a degree in electrical engineering.






January 28, 2010 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic: Magnetic Gear Drives
Speaker: Dr. Kent Davey


Propulsion drives for ships and submarines, windmills, and ocean floor turbines are all characterized by high torque and low speed. The conversion of mechanical energy to electrical or vice versa is characterized by large electromechanical volumes at low rotation speeds. Gears are a convenient way to convert the slow speed, high torque side to a high speed, low torque counterpart. A magnetic gearbox has the following advantages over mechanical gearboxes:


Clever topologies allow the magnetic gear to compete with a mechanical gear. The right topologies allow approximately ½ of the magnetic teeth to engage with their mate at any one time. Such an engagement is impossible with mechanical gears.

Dr. Kent Davey is an independent consultant in electromechanics and electromagnetic, and an adjunct Professor with the School of Physics, University of Houston. He is a Fellow with the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers and Editor of IEEE Transactions on Magnetics. He specializes in the interaction of electric and magnetic fields with matter and in the numerical computation of electric and magnetic fields.  He was formerly Senior Research Scientist with the Center of Electromechanics, University of Texas, Austin. Before that he was the Chief Research Scientist for American Maglev, and a tenured Associate Professor in Electrical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. He has 93 refereed journal papers with IEEE and another 90 conference publications.






<>December 8th, 2009 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic:  Speech Recognition
Speaker: Tracy Wichmann
 
Machine recognition of human speech has been under development since the early 60's. Everybody is familiar with the tedious telephone menus that we are forced to muddle through to communicate with our suppliers. The problems arise from two sources: poor recognition of phonemes and neglecting to relate the phoneme identification process to the context of the dialog. The  basic approach is to isolate phonemes from the sound pattern. If the phonemes can be identified then there is a one to one correspondence between a sequence of phonemes and a word. Unfortunately, phonemes are hard to isolate and so a statistical prediction algorithm, called a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is used. Another method is called Dynamic Time Warping (DTW). Vocoder patterns (frequency vs. time) are presented and it is shown that they are basically pictures of a sequence of phonemes blended together. DTW can adjust for speed and emphasis in speech. The HMM can help identify phonemes by their relationship to adjacent phonemes. This presentation includes a demonstration of voice recognition and vocoder operation.

Professor Wichmann graduated from MIT with a degree in Physics and did his graduate studies at Ohio State and UCLA in Electrical Engineering. His career specialty was Electronic Warfare and he is a charter member of the AOC (Electronic Defense Association). He joined the  IEEE in 1952. He worked for the Air Force as an Electronic Scientist and for Litton, Teledyne and Hughes Aircraft Company in various engineering and program management capacities . He did his Speech Recognition work originally at Litton in the 1960s. Mr. Wichmann has published over 50 papers in various scientific journals and given dozens of technical presentations at technical symposia and conventions over the years.




October 22nd, 2009 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic:  Communications Considerations for a Smart Grid
Speaker: Adrian Zvarych TCR Engineering

The nation's need for developing a Smart Grid has reached a pinnacle, where lessening our dependence on foreign oil, reducing carbon footprints, managing an aging electric infrastructure, and making the grid more efficient is vital to the health of our nations' economy.  At the heart beat of a Smart Grid is a robust and reliable communications infrastructure.  This presentation will provide an overview of critical Smart Grid components, and demonstrate how the communications infrastructure is vital to ensuring consumer loads and utility generation supply can be well balanced in the future.

Adrian Zvarych graduated from Carnegie-Mellon University with a BSEE in 1982, and has served in the utility industry since then.  Starting off as a protection & controls field engineer with FPL in Broward County, he was the youngest engineer to work on the design of a 500kV substation upgrade and expansion, and went on to develop the first 'virtual bus differential' station protection scheme at Florida Power Corp, exploiting available logic in the microprocessor based protective relays.  After entering the telecommunications field within Progress Energy in 1997, he was involved in developing fiber optic and other communication network topologies, managing telecom assets, and then later helping other utilities develop their telecom infrastructures. 



September 24th, 2009 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic:  South Pole Research Mission Presents Logistical and Physiological Challenges
Speaker: Michael Potash, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

The terrestrial monitoring of atmospheric light spectra demands freedom from light and air pollution. For this reason and others, the South Pole is continually occupied by a diverse collection of scientists taking advantage of its unique environment. Every December, the Space Physics Research facility at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University deploys scientists to the South Pole to calibrate instrumentation for data gathering that will occur during the dark Antarctic winter. In 2008, they sent the first father-son science team in the history of the South Pole. The endeavor presented various logistical and physiological challenges to the father-son duo and made for a memorable adventure.

Michael Potash was born in Brooklyn New York where he developed an interest in electronics at an early age. His talents in music and technology found synergistic expression when he was hired as a recording engineer and electronics technician at a New York recording studio. Michael taught technical electronics in both the New York and Florida public schools before accepting a position as an electronics technician at Embry-Riddle University. Today he spends his time designing flight-related instrumentation systems and teaching the occasional class for the university. Michael holds a BSEd from City College of New York and will shortly receive a BSEE from Embry-Riddle. He lives in Ormond Beach with his wife Melody and their two children, Noah and Eliana. Noah is in the process of earning his Master’s degree in software engineering at Embry-Riddle.




April 26, 2009 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic: Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Students Presentation
Speaker: Members of the ERAU Robotics Team

A team from the IEEE Student Branch of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University  (ERAU) went to attend the IEEE Southeast Con 2009 in Atlanta, GA in early March 2009. The purpose of the trip was to participate in a Robotics Competition held in conjunction with the Conference.  The theme of the competition was "Recycling beverage containers."  About forty colleges and universities from all over the Southeastern  portion of the United States entered this competition.

The ERAU students built a robot that can autonomously find, pick up, sort, and store plastic bottles, glass bottles, and aluminum cans by using various electrical and mechanical parts controlled by software.

The speakers for the evening were several members of the ERAU Robotics Team.  They  described the process taken to conceive, design, build, and test of their robot, the results of the competition, as well an the experiences gained and lessons learned.  A live demonstration of the robot's  functions was conducted.
 


March 26, 2009 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic:  Predicting Topographic and Bathymetric Measurement Performance
for Low-SNR Airborn Lidar
Speaker:  Clint Slatton,
Assistant Professor Department of Electrical
  and Computer Engineering, University of Florida, Gainsville Florida


Government and commercial airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) systems have enabled extensive measurements of the Earth’s surface and land cover over the past decade.  There is much interest, however, in employing smaller lidar systems that require less power to enable sensing from small unmanned aerial vehicles or satellites.  Technological advances in the performance of small micro-lasers and photo-detector sensitivity have recently enabled the development of experimental airborne lidar systems with low signal-to-noise-ratios (SNR).  Recent government and academic prototypes have indicated that low SNR airborne lidars could significantly increase the fidelity of terrain reconstruction over what is possible with existing conventional lidars.  Thus, there is a need to build up a modeling capability for such systems in order to aid in future system and mission design.  A numerical sensor simulator has been developed to model the expected returns from low SNR micro-laser altimeter systems and predict their performance.  Both optical and signal processing system components are considered, along with other factors, including atmospheric effects and surface conditions.

Topographic (solid earth) and bathymetric (littoral zone) measurement scenarios are considered.  Analysis of topographic simulation data focuses on the effect of solar noise on SNR and elevation accuracy while bathymetric performance is evaluated with regards to water depth and scan angle for different water clarities.  The mission conditions chiefly responsible for limiting performance of low-SNR lidar are discussed in detail, along with suggestions for further algorithm development and system performance evaluation.

K. Clint Slatton (S’95–M’02–SM’07) received B.S. and M.S. degrees in aerospace engineering and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering, all from the University of Texas (UT) in Austin, TX in 1993, 1997, 1999, and 2001, respectively.  From 2002 to 2003, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Center for Space Research at UT, where he worked on multiscale data fusion techniques for interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) measurements. He also worked at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the Radar Sciences Section and was a recipient of the NASA Graduate Student Research Program Fellowship. He is currently an Assistant Professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering at the University of Florida in Gainesville, FL. He is the Director of the Adaptive Signal Processing Laboratory and a co-investigator for the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM), for which he develops information-theoretic segmentation methods for ALSM data in complex environments, such as forests.  He was named a 2006 winner of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) for work on predicting signal propagation in highly cluttered environments using remotely sensed geometry from ALSM.  His research interests include remote sensing applications of ALSM and InSAR, high dimensional data segmentation, multiscale data fusion, graphical models, and photonics, with sponsored projects from NSF, NASA, the US Army, the US Navy, and NOAA.  Dr. Slatton is a member of the AGU and also of Sigma Xi, Tau Beta Pi, and Sigma Gamma Tau.


February 26, 2009 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic:  ENIGMA and ULTRA - The Nazi Code Machine and How it was Broken
Speaker: Tracy Wichmann

The Enigma machine is any of a family of related electro-mechanical rotor machines that have been used to generate ciphers for the encryption and decryption of secret messages.  The Enigma was invented by German engineer Arthur Scherbius at the end of World War I. A variety of Enigma models were produced but the German military model , the Wehrmacht Enigma, is the version most commonly discussed.

The machine has gained notoriety because Allied cryptologists were able to decrypt a vast number of messages that had been enciphered on the machine.  The intelligence, consequently code named ULTRA, was a substantial aid to the Allied war effort.  The exact influence of ULTRA is debated, but an oft repeated assessment is that decryption of German ciphers hastened the end of the European war by two years.

Through the Enigma cipher had cryptographic weakness, in pratice it was only in combination with other factors (procedural flaws, operator mistakes, occasional captured machines and key tables) that Allied cryptologistis were able to decrypt messages.

This talk is a summary of the Machine's development and use during WWII and low Ultra was able to exploit it.

Mr. Wichmann graduated from MIT with a degree in Physics.  He did his graduate work at Ohio State University majoring in Electrical Engineering.  He also attended UCLA and took numerous special courses in Communication Theory and Computer Programming. He began his career at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in the Electronic Countermeasures Research Section and continued to specialized in Electronic Warfare until his retirement.  He worked for many companies as an employee and a consultant and spent the last 15 years with Hughes Aircraft Company in the Radar  Systems Group.  He developed many signal processing algorithms and wrote numerous computer programs to exploit information from enemy signals or generate signals to deceived enemy radar, navigation and communication systems.He moved to Ormond Beach in 1995 (to be near grandchildren) and through IEEE connections, got a job teaching, part time at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University.  He also became interested in the potential for digital signal processing to recognize waveforms and devised the sine/cosine wavelet analysis.
<>



January 22, 2009 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic:  Electronic Roadmap to Improve Electronic Manufacturing Technologies
Speaker: George Till
Halifax Medical Center Foundation Speakers Bureau


INEMI is an industry led consortium of approximately 70 electronics manufactures, suppliers, and related organizations.  Its mission is to identify and  close technology gaps, which includes the development and integration of the electronics industry supply infrastructure.  Accelerated deployment of technology is shaped and led by member companies , and provides benefits to the global electronics industry.

The primary tool used to identify technology gaps is the Technology Roadmap, updated and published every two years. Products leaders from the large corporations define future technology  needs for specific product areas  and produce a set of product emulator tables defining the measurable attributes of technologies required for their product areas.  These requirements are then analyzed by manufacturing experts from approximately 20 manufacturing disciplines to identify risk, or gaps, in being able to satisfy product needs in the desired time frame.  These gaps are used to prioritize research and development efforts.

All of these efforts are  performed by volunteers from the member organizations.  The INEMI Secretariat is a small group headquartered in Herndon, Virginia who act as a facilitators of these efforts.  In recognition of the global nature of the electronics industry, offices have also been established in Europe and Asia.

George Till, after a brief tour of duty in the U.S. Army (Korea), attained a degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Indiana Institute of Technology in Fort Wayne, Indiana. For the next 18 months he designed equipment for the pulp and paper industry.  He spent the next 30 years in the computer industry with IBM, Burroughs, and Prime Computer.  His duties ranged from systems engineering, hardware and software development and management, to strategic planning.  During the last 10 years he has been associated with the INEMI (International Electronics Manufacturing Initiative) Technology Roadmap effort.




December 2nd, 2008 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic:  The da Vinci Surgical System
Speaker: Dr. Carl Schwenker
Halifax Medical Center Foundation Speakers Bureau

On December 2nd, 2008 Dr. Carl Schwenker MD from the Halifax Medical Center Foundation Speakers Bureau will speak on the da Vinci S Surgical System. The Halifax Medical Center has recently acquired the da Vinci S Surgical System, a sophisticated robotic platform designed to enable complex surgery using a minimally invasive approach.  The system translates the surgeon's motions into tiny movements and corrects for any hand tremors or extra hand motion. This allows for complex surgeries with small incisions, revolutionizing minimally invasive surgery and expanding the types of surgeries that can be performed.

The daVinci S Surgical System changes surgery in three ways, it simplifies many existing minimally invasive surgeries (MIS), laparoscopies.  Makes difficult MIS operations routine, and makes new MIS procedures possible.  The system replicates the surgeon's hand movements in real time.  It cannot be programmed, nor can it make decisions on its own to move in any way or perform any type of surgical maneuver without the surgeon's input. With the da Vinci S Surgical system, patients may experience improved patient outcomes such as reduced trauma to the body, reduced blood loss and need for transfusions, less post-operative pain and discomfort, less risk of infection, shorter hospital stays, faster recovery and return to normal daily activities, and less scarring.

Dr. Carl Schwenker was born in Cincinnati, Ohio.  He graduated from the University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine and served his internship and residency at Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL.  He was  in private practice, OB/GYN, in Daytona Beach from 1963 until 1996.  After retirement he started a second career with the Foundation (Halifax Medical Center) working in fund raising, Medical staff liaison and organizing a Community Speakers Bureau.  Dr. Schwenker also worked as an advocate for prevention of child abuse. He and his wife became foster parents and ultimately adopted a special needs child.  He also served on the board of Community Partnerships for Children, a lead agency of the Florida Department of Children and Families




October 25th, 2008 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic: Ballot Initiatives, Property Values and the Impact on Education
Speaker: Morgan B. Gilreath Jr.
Volusia County Property Appraiser's Office

On October 23rd, 2008 Morgan B. Gilreath Jr. of the Volusia County Property Appraiser's Office will speak on the ballot initiatives being decided at the November 4th, 2008 elections. These ballot initiatives will share the election ballot with candidates running for local , county and national offices.  These initiatives may have an effect on local property values and taxes. Mr. Gilreath will discuss the impact of the past and proposed constitutional amendments of local education from elementary through the collegiate level.  The talk will be very timely and will not be political, but fact based.
 
Morgan B. Gilreath Jr., has been a Volusia county employee since 1986 and has been with the Volusia County Property Appraiser's Office for all of that time.  He holds an MA degree and is a US Army Vietnam veteran.  His professional accreditation's include the Certified Florida Appraiser (CFA) designation by  the Florida Department of Revenue and the Accredited Senior Appraiser (ASA) designation awarded  by the American Society of Appraisers.

He is a former Associate Professor at the University of Georgia, where he was instrumental in appraisal related course development and instruction.  Mr. Gilreath has published extensively and  has  been involved in the development of several appraisal textbooks used nationally.



September 25th, 2008 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic: Climate Change
Speaker: Dr. Lou McNally
Assistant Professor of Meteorology for Applied Meteorology & Climatology
Embry Riddle Aeronautical University , Daytona Beach, Florida


On September 25th, 2008 Dr. Lou McNally of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University will be addressing climate changes (global warming to some people) and man's input, potential impact, and answers (based in fact) to questions about the whole problem. There is quite a bit of literature on both sides of the question, but the peer-reviewed science (the stuff we can now measure) all points one way.  He looking forward to helping solve the dilemma in everybody's mind.
  
Lou McNally, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Meteorology for Applied Meteorology, Broadcast Meteorology, Aviation Meteorology and Climatology at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.  His experience includes work with the Bermuda Weather Service as an Operational Meteorologist (Forecaster) with Hurricane/Subtropical Storm experience.  He also heads McNally & Associates, Inc. which provides Operational and Consulting Meteorologist services.  Dr. McNally received his Ph.D. (Interdisciplinary) and M.S. from the University of Maine.



                                     April 24th, 2008 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic:   The Return to the Moon Robotics Competition
Speaker: 2008 Robotic Team Members ea
  Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach Florida


On April 5th, 2008 the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Student Branch of the Daytona IEEE Section sent a team of students to the SoutheastenCon 2008 in Huntsville Alabama.  The purpose of the trip was to participate in a Robotic Competition held in conjunction with the Southeastern Conference.  The theme of the competition was "Return to the Moon." Forty one colleges and universities from all over the southeast portion of the United States entered this competition.
  
The ERAU students built a robot that could autonomously explore and retrieve resources and then transport them back to a lunar base station.   The playing field was a 6 foot by 6 foot plywood deck., partially covered with  with small rocks firmly glued to the plywood surface to form a simulated lunar surface.  The objects to be detected and stored by the robot were wooden blocks of various colors equipped with RFID tags.  The block took on various values based on their color and value noted on the RFID tags.  The autonomous robot had to (1) find the location of the wood blocks with IR sensors, (2) drive to the location of the blocks with the help of the IR sensors and digital compass, (3) sense the worth of the blocks with the RFID reader, (4) pick up the blocks with and store on board the robot, (5) carry the blocks back and deposit them at the base station. To add confusion to the process two robots were on the same playing field simultaneously competing for the same blocks and physical positions.

The speakers for the evening will be several of the members of the Embry Riddle Aeronautical University Robotic Team.  They will describe the design and operation of the robot, and the results of the competition.



                            March 27th, 2008 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic:   The Spitizer Space Telescope View of the Solar System
Speaker: Dr. Yan Fenandez , Assistant Professor of Astronomy
  Department of Physics, University of Central Florida

Since its launch in 2003, NASA's fourth Great Observatory, the Spitzer Space Telescope, has devoted over 1500 hours of time looking at various objects in our Solar System.  Its unique vantage point and design have given us an unprecedented infrared view of our neighborhood.  Spitzer has observed near-Earth asteroids whizzing by, icy asteroids beyond Neptune, even a cloud of dust that surrounds planet Earth.  Dr. Fernandez will review some of the highlights of over four years of data collected by this remarkable telescope and will discuss some of the open questions that remain.

Yan Fernandez received his Ph.D.. in Astronomy in 1999 from the University of Maryland and has been an Assistant  Professor at the University of Central Florida's Department of Physics since 2005.  His research area is planetary science with an emphasis on the small bodies of the Solar System.  His studies involve the thermal, physical. and compositional properties of active comets, dormant comets, asteroids, and icy outer-Solar System objects.  His goal is to understand the evolution of our Solar System.  To do this he uses telescopes around the world and in space, including the Spitzer Space Telescope.



        
February 28th, 2008 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic:   Radio Astronomy and the Allen Telescope Array
Speaker: William C. Barott PhD, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Radio Astronomy is a discipline never satisfied with the current state of technology.  Since its beginnings, scientists have been in search of lower noise systems to delve deeper into the cosmos, and more processing power to analyze the volumes of data generated by their telescopes.  Recent Advances in FPGA technology have enabled a fundamental change in the design of large radio telescopes.  The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is the first of this generation, which combines high speed DSP with many small antennas to rival more costly large antenna telescopes.  Built by University of California Berkeley and the SETI Institute and funded by Microsoft's Paul Allen, the ATA will consist of 350 separate low-cost antennas ad be capable of a diverse range of coordinated tasks,  including 24/7 simultaneous observing by multiple users.  In this talk, Dr. Barott will discuss the history and future of radio astronomy and SETI, along with his personal experiences as a developer for the ATA Project.

William C. Barott, PhD is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.  He is a graduate of Georgia Institute of Technology (BS/MS/PhD), and specializes in antenna, phased arrays, and RF systems.  He has been involved in SETI-related work since his undergraduate years, and joined the Allen Telescope Array project as the primary developer of the ATA beamformer.  He spent the summer of 2007 living at the ATA Hat Creek facility in Northern California.


                                             January 24th, 2008 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
           Topic:   Forecasting of Foreign Exchange Rates using Artificial Neural Networks

Speaker: Dr. Daniel Plante Associate Professor of Computational Sciences
Stetson University

In a world utilizing only a single currency, investments could be made strictly based on the environment, however, this is no longer the case.  Movement of one currency with respect to another may strongly influence or even overwhelm the rate of return on the investment itself.  Forecasting of exchange rates can itself be treated as an investment vehicle if it can be done so accurately and therefore has been treated with great interest by the research community.  Also, in countries where loans carry high interest rates, corporations and corporate customers often prefer to take loans in foreign currencies with lower interest rates. In order to minimize the currency risk it is common to construct a loan that consists of baskets of currencies.

In this presentation, an introduction to neural networks will be provided along with its application to the prediction of foreign exchange rates.  As a case study, we will focus on the ISD/ISK (US Dollar to Icelandic Krona) exchange rate, as Multi-Currency Instruments are quite popular in Iceland.  Results using various neural network learning algorithms will be provided along with an overview of the state of the art in the field.

Daniel Plante received his Ph.D. in physics from Notre Dame in 1995 and was a research postdoc in atomic physics at Auburn University before entering the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at Stetson University, where he is presently an Associate Professor of  Computational Sciences.  Daniel's research interests are essentially everything that students interested in working with him are interested in, though his personal favorites are machine learning and artificial intelligence.  During recent years, his research has included finite element grid arrangement,  f financial computing, automated music transcription, multi-server database design, and data mining applied to optimizing software patent similarity.

His work was done in collaboration with Bleeder Mugnusson.  Baldur graduated from Stetson University in December 2005 with a double major in Mathematics and Computer Science.  There he completed his senior research paper on "Currency Predictions for Mult-Currency Instruments" and was awarded the Emmet S. Ashcraft Award, presented to the most outstanding junior in mathematics and computer science at Stetson.  Baldur is presently a Ph.D. student in the School of Operations Research and Information Engineering at Cornell University.




                                   29th
November - 2007 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
                                             Topic:   From Macro to Micro to Nano Electronics
                                                   Moore's Law and Materials
Speaker: Dr. Mark Law, Chairman of  Electrical and Computer Engineering
University of Florida

The 20th century saw a tremendous increase in electronics capabilities.  We now live in an information age dominated by electronic products in information resources, communication, and entertainment.  How did this happen?  Who were the key players and what were their inventions that changed the world?  What is Moore's Law and how has it driven the semiconductor industry?  Come and learn about the history of the electronics industry and where we are today.  I'll even explain why semiconductor stock prices are so volatile.  What are the challenges for the future?  What strange things happen in the quantum world that will limit future productivity?  Why have CPU clock speeds stopped increasing?  What is nano and how do we get there?  I'll describe some future challenges to provide faster and cheaper technologies.

Mark Law is a professor and chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Florida.  He received the B.S. Cpr.E. degree from Iowa State University in 1981, the M.S.E.E. from, Stanford University in 1982, and the Ph.D. degree from Stanford University in 1988.  His current research interests are in integrated circuit process modeling, characterization, and device modeling.  Dr. Law was named a National Science Foundation Presidential Faculty Fellow in 1992, 1993 Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) Technical Excellence Award, Outstanding Young Alumni of Iowa State in 1994.  College of Engineering Teacher of the the Year in 1996-97, a UF Research Fellow in 1998, and won the 2006 SRC Aristotle Award for Outstanding Graduate Student Advising and Iowa State Professional Achievement Award in 2007.  Dr. Law has written over 200 papers in the area of process and device modeling and has advised 17 Ph.D. students.  He has been involved in almost $15 million of funding during his career, most from industrial sources.  He is an IEEE EDS distinguished lecturer.  He is a member of the American Physical Society, Material Research Society, and American Society for Engineering Education.  He was named an IEEE Fellow in 1998  for his contributions to integrated circuitry process modeling and simulation.


           
                                25 October - 2007 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
                                                                 Topic:   Identity Theft
                              Speaker: Theresa Ronnebaum and Jay Young                              

With the communications and computer technology now available, our ability to communicate, conduct business, make purchases. and conduct financial transactions has become easier and faster.  However, with this comes the risk that information about your personal and financial identity may be stolen.  This risk has increased dramatically in the past years.  Once stolen, it may take years to rectify the damage done to your credit as well as a considerable financial toll.  Our speaker will discuss these issues and what you can do to reduce the threat.

Theresa Ronnebaum has been employed with the Florida Attorney General's Office since 1999.  She has been with the Office of Statewide Prosecution since September of 2002 as the first federally funded Identity Theft Victim Advocate to Florida.  Mrs. Ronnebaum is also currently working with the Office of Victims of Crime as a consultant on the topic of Identity Theft and how to better assist victims.  Her passion for the criminal justice field began with her prior employment as a county probation officer and as a victim advocate in the sex crimes, domestic violence and child abuse units for the 9th Judicial Circuit State Attorney's Office.  Theresa received her Bachelor's degree in Criminal Justice with a Minor in Psychology from Florida State University in 1995.

Jay Young is a graduate of Broward Engineering College with a BSEE, Nova University with a BSBA.  He has worked for GE, Lockheed Martin, NASA, Public Service Co. of New Mexico, and Florida Power and Light too name a few and has been awarded 2 US patents.  Jay has been a business owner for over 28 years, He is a Member of CrimeStoppers, served on the Community Arbitration Program, Community Citizen Law Enforcement Advisory Committee for Volusia County and currently is a member and past Chair of the Daytona Beach Police Advisory Committee.  He also has had training in Anti-riot management and anti terrorism.  Winner of the Community Service Award and the Golden Circle Award for community service.  He currently serves on the county Land Management and Regulation Commission for Volusia County.


                
                 27 September - 2007 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
                                    Topic:  Getting to Know You
                                    Speaker: Members of the Daytona IEEE Section

To kick off the new  season, we thought it would be nice to have an opportunity for our members to get to know each other.  With that thought in mind, we decided to deviate from our usual program of guest speakers and have a more casual, social program.

We all know that it doesn't take much to get an engineer to talk about his/her work.  So, we'll take advantage of what some non-engineering types may consider an annoying "social disorder" and have some interesting, informative presentations.

To begin the program, our officers will introduce themselves and give a brief verbal summary of their background, professional experience, place of current and/or former employment, hobbies and any noteworthy achievement or humorous work event that may interest our members.

After that, we invite the other members in attendance to introduce themselves and give a similar brief background and any related story about his or her career you think may be interesting.  We also invite the members  to introduce their spouse and/or guests.

However, knowing that most engineers have a tendency to get carried away when they get talking about their work, we may be forced to employ 'the hook' after about 4 minutes to give everyone a chance to have their few minutes of fame.  Although we encourage participation, those who aren't comfortable speaking or are in the witness protection program or working undercover with an assumed identity, can just introduce themselves.



                     28 April - 2007 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
                          Topic: IEEE Student Section Robot Competition
                 Speakers:
Joe Poznanski and members of the student team                                      

This year, the Embry-Riddle IEEE Student Section competed in the hardware competition at the 2007 IEEE SoutheastCon conference.  With the support of the IEEE Daytona Section and the technical experience of Dr. Liu, the team had a valuable and fun learning experience.  As the decision to enter the competition was made relatively late, it was not until November that preliminary design ideas were considered, and not until early January before the club began meeting in its entirely for the "build".  This gave the team approximately 2.5 months to complete the project,  not that much time considering the complexity of the project.  Due to this brevity of time, it was decided to  make the robot as simple as possible, and pursue several launching systems to determine the most accurate and efficient one.  Enough members were in attendance to make this feasible; this allowed everyone to be involved in the actual robot creation progress, regardless of skill level.


Through the course of  its development, the project taught the robot building team everything from basic metal and woodworking, to mechanical and electrical components, to teamwork and cooperation.

This project was especially important to the team as it was primarily composed of freshmen, making this the team's first  robot building experience, and assuredly not the last.  Design consideration to next year's robot are already in the works, and several more facility members as well as IEEE Daytona Section members have expressed an interest in participating.  The presentation will discuss the robot's design, competition results, and the lessons they learned from the project.  Joe Poznanski, Hardware Team Leader, IEEE Student Section and members of the student  team will participate in the lecture.                         



                             22 March-2007 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic:  Observations of the Past 50 Years In the Electronics  Field
Speaker: Dr. Albert Helfrick
                                           
This year marks Dr. Helfrick's 50th year as a licensed amature radio operator.  In recongnitation of that milestone he has prepard this presentation of his experinece in the electronic field. This presentation is not so much about him, or even amature radio but more about the incredible inroads made by the electronics industry. The presentation is not all technical, but the techno-crowd will find a lot of interesting material.  He will talk about his first vacuuum radio to the latest low noise "Pseudomorphic High Elecron Mobility Field Effect Transitors" that he has used in space-related communications.  Much of the presentation  is downright funny. There are stories of his day in broadcasting, the U.S. Army in Viet Nam, his college days and his latest endoverse in space communications. 

Dr. Albert Helfrick is chair of the Electrical and Systems Engineering De partment and Mechanical , Civil and Engineering Science Department at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.  He is the author of 14 text books, more than 100 articles and contributions to books.  He is a senior member of the IEEE, technical editor of the IEEE Tranactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems.  He was recently named "Outstanding Engineering Educator" for the Florida Council.  He is an Associate Fellow of the AIAA, a member of the Digital Avionics Technical Committee, Associate Editor of the AIAA's Journal on Aviation Computing, Information and Communications.  He is a Fellow and past officer and board member of the Radio Club of America, the Quarter Century Wireless and the Old Timers Club.                                          




 
                  22 February-2007 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
                                         Topic:  Science of Management
                                                   Speaker:
Roger Gurbic

Real life examples of situations, facing engineering managers, are seldom taught in electrical engineering courses. This presentation will illustrate the responsibilities and functions of a manager.  Early management studies such as Maslow's hierarchy and Taylor analysis of tasks will be discussed.  Some of the available management and decision tools will also be discussed

Roger Grubic retired from  Lockheed Martin as a Program Director. His accomplishments include managing the development and testing of the Landsat D Ground Segment ( a program that developed over 1.5 million lines of software) for NASA Goddard.  He led the technical portion of the winning proposal for the USAF GPS Block IIR spacecraft program and later led the GPS Block IIR spacecraft  System Engineering effort.  Roger was the Program Director for the 5D-3 Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP). a weather satellite program for the USAF, and later led the Spitzer Space Telescope spacecraft program, an Infra Red observatory built for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.  During his career at Lockheed Martin and GE Astro Space, he was both a program manager and a functional manager, in the matrix organizations.  Earlier at Bell Laboratories Roger was involved in state of the art digital design for missile systems, software development and the development of a cartridge magnetic tape recorder for PBXs and central switching systems.  He holds a BEE and a MSEE from the Ohio State University and an MBA from Villanova University.  He is a Life Senior Member of the IEEE and the Daytona Section Vice Chairman.



                    28 January-2007 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
                                   Topic:  Volusia Beach Damage and Restoration
                                          Speaker:
R. P. "Bob" Haviland

R. P. "Bob" Haviland is well known for his work on environmental problems.  He will present the results of his study of the beaches of Volusia County, in the form of a slide show.  This includes many beach events of the last 25  years, showing the steady loss of beach, plus photos of major damaging events which have happened.  The processes involved in both normal day-to-day events and those of major storms are covered.  Current and proposed actions of "Beach Restoration" are listed with local examples of results. The effect of recorded sea level rise and the probable future,  plus an approach which will have to be taken some day are included.

Robert P. "Bob" Haviland was one of the early workers in the space program.  He was project engineer for the first two stage rocket, the first object to reach outer space, and the first launch from Cape Canaveral.  He pioneered ablation heat protection and recovery from space.  He conceived the Discover Program, the foundation of satellite reconnaissance.  Retired, he is now active in environmental problems.  Bob graduated from the Missouri School of Mines.  He worked for Schlumberger Well Surveying and then for General Electric for 30 years before retiring.   Since retirement he has spent his time writing and studying environmental problems. He has 7 patents, 16 books and many articles and papers to his name.




                    30 November-2006 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
                                   Topic:  Reliability of Pb-Free Electronics
            
                    Speaker: Ronald "Ron" Gedney, Consultant 
                                                            

The European Union’s move to Pb-free electronics has been a challenge to electronic packaging technology. From a technical point of view, the move to higher temperature soldering has impacted all components and processes involved in electronics manufacturing. A little known reliability issue has arisen from the use of tin (Sn) plated component leads (terminals) which can form small mono-filament protrusions commonly known as “whiskers”. Tin whiskers have impacted missiles, satellites, nuclear power plants and computer systems – that we know of.

This presentation will discuss how the problem of tin whiskers is being addressed, what is being done around the globe on this issue and its status.

Ron Gedney retired as V.P. Operations from iNEMI in 2002, but continues to do some consulting work on Pb-free electronics. He joined the consortium in 1996, bringing with him nearly 40 years experience in the development, manufacturing and procurement of electronic components and packaging. The bulk of his career was spent at IBM, where he was involved in the development of electronic packages for semiconductors.

Mr. Gedney is a Life Fellow of the IEEE. He is past president of the IEEE Components, Packaging and Manufacturing Technology (CPMT) Society, past General Chair of the Electronic Components and Technology Conference, and past chair of the CPMT Binghamton chapter. Mr. Gedney received the CMPT David Feldman Outstanding Contribution Award, and the IEEE third Millenium Medal. In 2004, he received the SolderTec Global Lead-free Solder Award 2004 “in recognition of his leadership and technical expertise in eliminating lead from electronic assemblies”. He has been granted several patents and has authored numerous articles. He graduated from Tufts University with a degree in electrical engineering.


                   

26 October-2006 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
Topic:  Planets, Draft Planets and Small Solar System Bodies
Speaker: Roger R. Hoefer, Curator of Astronomy for Volusia County Schools
and the Museum of Arts and Sciences Planetarium

                             

The recent "demotion" of Pluto to a dwarf planet status has created a lot of public outcry, but the actions of the International Astronomical Union during their convention in Prague this past August are not without historical precedence.  Roger R. Hoefer, Curator of Astronomy for Volusia District Schools and the Museum of Arts and Sciences will explore the history, origins and evolution of the nomenclature that astronomers use to identify the various members of our solar system.  Also included will be some of the latest images of Pluto and extrasolar planets taken by the Hubbell Space Telescope.

Roger Hoefer is a 1962 graduate of Northwest Oklahoma State University in Alva, Oklahoma with a BA Ed in elementary education. He began his teaching career in Jefferson County Public Schools near Denver, Colorado as an elementary teacher and outdoor education specialist.  He also trained as a planetarium specialist in the school system's planetarium.  In 1959 he was hired as Curator of Astronomy at the Dayton Museum of Natural History in Dayton, Ohio where he was planetarium and observatory director.  He was Planetarium Director and space science educator in the Future Astronaut Training Program at the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas for 5 years before moving to Daytona Beach in 1991.


   
                       28 September-2006 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
                                   Topic:  Icelandic Fiber Optic Network
                     Speaker:
Charles R. Husbands, Blackhorse Communications

Near the peak of the Cold War the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) suggested installing a series of high power long range radar systems in the island nation of Iceland.  The purpose of these radar systems was to provide tracking and identification all aircraft crossing the Atlantic Ocean between Labrador and Ireland.  These radar also allowed aircraft to be tracked in the Arctic Ocean between  Greenland to Scotland. The final solution for interconnecting these radar systems was to design and construct a dual counter rotating fiber optic network around the entire perimeter of the island.

This presentation will cover the design and construction of this Icelandic fiber optic network.  In a cooperative effort between the Icelandic Post and Telegraph (IPT) and NATO  provided a facility was designed to carry not only the radar data but all of the telephone, data and television communications traffic on the island. Because of the unique terrain and environmental conditions encountered in Iceland a unique set of construction techniques were required  to construct this network. This presentation will describe the technical details of  the cable plant, operational hardware and the network control necessary to successfully build and operate this network. 

Charles Husbands holds a Masters Degree in  Electrical Engineering and a Masters Degree in Engineering Management.  He has been a practicing engineer for over 40 years  and is a Senior Life Member of the IEEE.  In 1996 he retired from the MITRE Corporation where he directed a research group in fiber optic technology.  In retirement he formed Blackhorse Communications a   private consulting company specializing in optical and microwave communications.  He has published and lectured extensively on optical networks and communication systems and hold a number of patents in this area.  From 1987  to 1994 he served as a consultant for the United States Air Force to the Iceland Post and Telecommunications service supporting the design and implementation of Iceland's national fiber optic ring network.



            
   
                           27 April-2006 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
                             Topic:  Design of a High Bypass Turbofan Engine
                    Speaker: Kristina Malakle - Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Senior aerospace engineering students forming the fictitious company Enginuity Technologies from Dr. Attia's Air Breathing Propulsion Detail Design Course will present their final design project.  Seniors Christopher Cassann, Ed Schurr, George Tolls, Jon Delmonico, Matt Gonce, Naiara Petralanda, Robin Hertherington, Ron Driggers, Rhan Rafty and Kristina Malakle were challenged to design an entire high bypass turbofan engine. The presentation will include a basic overview of aero gas turbine engines and their components.  Enginuity Technologies' EX9-A, is an exciting innovative turbofan design including advanced technology such as carbon fiber composite fan blades, foil bearings, active noise control and much more!  Enginuity Technologies' will present their design in 3-D CAD renderings.  This presentation should be exciting and one not to be missed.

Kristina Malakle is a member of Enginuity Technologies and a graduating senior.  She has been a member of ERAU-IEEE  for the last three years.  Kristina has been an active participant with IEEE and has served as Recruiting Committee Chairman and as the ERAU Student Branch Chairman.  Kristina is looking forward to an exciting career as an aerospace engineer and intends on staying active with the IEEE.




   
                   23 March-2006 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
                                          Topic:  Pictures in Sound
                        Speaker: Tracy Wichmann - Daytona IEEE Section

Everybody knows that sounds are made up of many frequencies.  In music they  are called harmonics.  Most sounds are very complex but what makes them  recognizable is a combination of frequencies and the times that they occur.
Professor Wichmann has devised a signal processing technique which he calls Diacoustic Analysis.  That is the use of sounds to detect failures, or implending failures, in machines.  It works by breaking the sound signal into a time vs. frequency pattern.  Now it is well known that the time resolution of a signal is inversely proportional to its frequency (Gabor's Theorem).  Using a family of sine/cosine wavelets, the Diacoustic technique extracts the frequencies
present in a sound over 10 octaves (10-10,000 Hz) with time precision that varies with frequency.  Thus there  is a 1/10 of a second interval for the 10 Hz component up to a 0.0001 seconds for a 10 kHz component.  It is shown that for the case of automotive engine exhaust, these pictures reveal defects that are hard to detect by hearing alone.

Mr. Wichmann graduated from MIT with a degree in Physics.  He did his graduate work at Ohio State University majoring in Electrical Engineering.  He also attended UCLA and took numerous special courses in Communication Theory and Computer Programming.

He began his career at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in the Electronic Countermeasures Research Section and continued to specialized in Electronic Warfare until his retirement.  He worked for many companies as an employee and a consultant and spent the last 15 years with Hughes Aircraft Company in the Radar  Systems Group.  He developed many signal processing algorithms and wrote numerous computer programs to exploit information from enemy signals or generate signals to deceived enemy radar, navigation and communication systems.
                     



 
                   9 February 2005 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
            Topic:  2005 DARPA Autonomous Vehicle Grand Challenge Program
                            Speaker: Remo Pillat - University of Central Florida

 In 2004 the DARPA Grand Challenge field test of autonomous ground vehicles ran from Barstow California to Primm, Nevada and offered a  $ 1 million prize. However. the prize  went unclaimed as no vehicle of the 15 finalists were able to complete the difficult desert route.  In 2005 the Grand Challenge Prize was increased to $ 2 million.  The Stanford University Racing Team claimed the prize completing the course of 132 miles in a winning  time of 6 hours, 53 minutes.  This presentation will  concentrate on the major challenges faced in a developing an autonomous vehicle for long distance operation in a hostile environment.  Focus was placed on the interdisciplinary character of the work effort and the  application of this technology to future autonomous vehicles.

Remo Pillat received his MS in Computer Science from Ilmenau Technical University,Germany.  He is currently a Ph.D. student in the Computer Vision Lab at the University of Central Florida (UCF).  His interest in Germany included image metrology with an Atomic Force Microscope, and Indoor and Outdoor robot navigation and localization. In 2004, he participated in an exchange study program between his home university and UCF, where he was one of the first members of UCF's Grand Challenge Team.  During the qualification and contest period of the DARPA Grand  Challenge.  Remo was the Chief Software Developer for UCF's autonomous car.  His current graduate work involves research in the area of 3D Robot  vision.


                    19 January 2006 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
             Topic:  Managing Electrical Power Distribution System Reliability
                                     Speaker: Elmer Lee Pettit, Jr.

Fifteen years ago, in conjunction with the Quality Improvement Program, Florida Power and Light  made a major effort to improve service reliability using reliability tools and techniques. In this presentation we  will look at that effort.  It will how the distribution system works, how reliability is measured, and how it can be modeled.  We will then look at what causes service interruption and how operation can improve reliability.

Elmer Lee Pettit Jr. (M'58) received his BS Degree in Electrical Engineering from Vanderbuilt University and his MS in system Science from Polytechnic University, NY.  He is a "C" Course graduate in General Electric's Advanced Course in Engineering and a registered Professional Engineer in Florida and Maryland. Mr. Pettit joined Florida Power and Light Company (FTP) in 1958 and except for five years with the General Electric Apollo Support Department, worked at FPL until his retirement in September 1993.  His technical interest at FPL included distribution system analysis, protective device coordination, long range planning and reliability modeling. He developed the "FEEDPRO" distribution  analysis software package and has authored and conducted training courses, including "Protection DEvices Coordination" and "Distribution Design for Reliability". He has also developed an expert system for fuse sizing and capacitor bank placement on distribution circuits.  Mr. Pettit is presently a consulting engineer specializing in power distribution systems and is Treasurer of the IEEE Daytona Section.


                     17 November 2005 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
                        Topic:  Satellite Communications: Today and Tomorrow
                         Speaker: Dr. Sajjad H. Durrani - Distinguished Lecture

Satellite communications technology has made tremendous advances since its inception in the mid-1960s. The industry continues to flourish in spite of occasional setbacks.  The talk will give an overview, followed by a brief discussion of the basic concepts and techniques involve; typical satellites and earth stations; and the major services currently available. It will touch upon domestic and international regulatory issues, and discuss the trends.

Dr. Durrani's career since 1949 includes more than 10 years of teaching, 10 years with industry, followed by 18 years with NASA.  At NASA he held research and management positions at Goddard Space Flight Center and Headquarters. After his retirement in 1992 from NASA he worked until 1998 for the Computer Science Corporation. Since then he has served as a Guest Lecture with the International Space University in Strasbourg, France, as a consultant to Pakistan under the UN Development Program (1999), and IEEE Executive Fellow with the Federal Communications Commission in Washington, D.C. (2000-2001).  He has been named an IEEE Engineering and Diplomacy Fellow to work as a Technical Advisor with the US Department of State in 2004.

                         20 October 2005 - IEEE Section Dinner Meeting
                                  Subject: Introductory Analysis of High Level Systems
                                          Speaker: Robert P. Haviland  

R. P. "Bob" Haviland was one of the early workers in the nation's space program.  He served as Project Engineer for a number of space projects including the development of the first two-stage rocket, the launch of the first object to reach outer space, and the first missile launch from Cape Cavernal. Bob pioneered the use of ablation coatings to provide heat protection, enabling successful reentry and recovery of space material. Bob is credited with conceiving the Discovery Program, the foundation of using satellites for reconnaissance purposes.

In retirement he is now active in examining solutions to environmental concerns.In this presentation Bob will examine the concept of "systems."  Systems exist in almost every field.  We have computer systems, mechanical systems, the solar system, and even the Ponzi Pyramid System.  Despite the casual use of the term there is no formal definition of what constitutes a system.  In this presentation a test will be developed to show that a system has been created.  This process will then be extended to formalize the common concept of sub-systems, systems and super-systems and provide examples of this designation.


                       22 September 2005 - IEEE Dinner Meeting
                Topic: Central Florida, A Hotspot for Modeling and Simulation (M&S) Technology                                Speaker: Robert L. Wittman Jr., MITRE Corporation             

 Central Florida is a hotspot for modeling and simulation (M&S) technology and it continues to grow at a rapid pace.  Not only  will you find a number of world-class M&S research and educational facilities in the area, but Central Florida is also home to a range of DoD sponsors and contracting organizations.  Additionally, there are growing demands and support for other "secure" and entertainment  gaming technologies.  This presentation explores  the variety of existing and emerging M&S activities and technologies in and around Central Florida.

Robert Wittman Jr. holds a Masters Degree in Software Engineering from the University of West Florida and a Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from the University of Central Florida. He works for the Mitre Corporation as an architect for the Army's next generation simulation system.


       1 June 2005 - May Meeting and IEEE Life Member Affinity Group Trip
        Topic: Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Museum and Missile Launch Facilities  

The Life Member Affinity Group of the Daytona Section of IEEE will toured the Air Force Station,  Museums and Missile Launch facilities located south of the NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The Air Force Base was the assembly and launch facility which supported  the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo Missions.  The base is still the major launch facility for most of the nation's commercial and military satellite programs. 


                            21 April 2005 - IEEE Dinner Meeting
                                     Topic: Pico Satellite Design Effort
          Speaker: Pico Satellite Design Team, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University  

In late September 2004 a team of student at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University began work on the design of the Pico Satellite. The Pico Satellite is being developed as part of the Florida University Satellite competition.   The purpose of the Embry-Riddle satellite design is to count lighting strikes from its Low Earth Orbit of approximately 800 km in altitude.  The satellite will detect lighting over a predetermined geographical areas and will record the number of lighting strikes during a prescribed detection time.  The goal of the competitive satellite design effort is to encourage Florida Universities to develop satellite systems.


                        24 March 2005 - IEEE Dinner Meeting
                        Topic: Moons, Methane, and Saltwater Oceans
               Speaker: Roger R. Hoefer, Curator of Astronomy for Volusia County
                            Schools and the Museum of Arts and Sciences
                                    Planetarium in Daytona Beach

Roger Hoefer will discuss recent discoveries by NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) and ESA's Express orbiter combined with information from the Galileo and Cassinni/Huygens mission.  These studies have added to a growing list of discoveries that have exobiologists around the world excited about the possibility of finding life on other bodies in our solar system.  Roger R. Hoefer has a BA Ed. in elementary education from Northwest Oklahoma State University. In 1969 he was hired as Curator of Astronomy at the Dayton Museum of Natural History in Dayton, Ohio where he was planetarium and observatory director.  He was Planetarium Director and space science educator in the Future Astronaut Training Program at the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson Kansas before taking his present position in Daytona Beach in 1991.



                         24 February 2005 - IEEE Dinner Meeting
                   Topic: Analyzing Legacy Systems with the Architecture Analysis
                                     and Design Language (AADL)
               Speaker: Dr. David P. Gluch, Professor in the Department of Computer
                     and Software Engineering at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University  

Dr. David P. Gluch research interest is model-based software engineering with a focus on high dependability performance-critical systems analysis and verification.  His current research centers on the extension and application of the SAE Architecture Analysis and Design Language (AADL) standard. Dr. Gluch has a Ph.D. in physics from Florida State University and is a senior member of IEEE.  He has co-authored a book on real-time UNIX systems and authored numerous technical reports and professional articles.


                              20 January 2005 - IEEE Dinner Meeting
       Topic: Spectral Sliced Technology Applied to Optical Local Area Network
         Speaker: Charles R. Husbands, Consultant, Blackhorse Communications  

Charles Husbands holds a Masters Degree in Electrical Engineering and a Masters Degree in Engineering Management.  He has been a practicing Engineer for over 40 years and is a Senior Life Member of the IEEE.  In 1996 he retired from the MITRE Corporation where he directed a research group in fiber optics technology.  In retirement he formed Blackhorse Communications a private consulting company specializing in optical and microwave communications systems. He has published and lectured extensively on optical networks and communication systems and holds a number of patents in this area.  In this presentation he will describe a  Wavelength Division Multiplexing technique developed by spectrum slicing select wavelengths from low cost LED components.  This technique can be deployed to increase the bandwidth capacity of existing optical networks.