Upcoming Events:

Neural Network Forecasting of Solar Power for NASA Ames Sustainability Base

Chaitanya Poolla, ECE, Carnegie Mellon University (SV)

Date & Time: Friday, December 12, 2014 04:00 PM PST

Location: Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, Building 23, Moffett Field, CA, Room 118

Registration Fee: None

Abstract: Solar power prediction remains an important challenge for renewable energy integration primarily due to its inherent variability and intermittency. This talk would describe a neural network based solar power forecasting framework developed for the NASA Ames Sustainability Base (SB) solar array using the publicly available National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) weather data forecasts. The prediction inputs include temperature, irradiance and wind speed obtained through the NOAA NOMADS server in real-time. The neural network (ANN) is trained and tested on input-output data from on-site sensors. The NOAA archived forecast data is then input to the trained ANN model to predict power output spanning over nine months (June 2013 - March 2014). The efficacy of the model is determined by comparing predicted power output against on-site sensor data.

Biography:Chaitanya Poolla received his Bachelors degree in Aerospace Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kharagpur in 2011. He is currently purusing a PhD program in Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. His research areas of interest include Dynamics, Learning, Optimization and Control with applications to Microgrids, Solar Power Forecasting, UAV's and Energy Sciences.

Directions: Exit 101 on Moffett Blvd Exit and proceed to the Security Gate. You will pass through the security gate to reach the campus. A valid driver’s license, state ID, or federal ID is required. When presenting your ID, let them know you are going to Carnegie Mellon.

After Passing Through the Security Gate: Once you proceed through security gate, move into the right lane before you approach the “Y” in the road (about 200 yards from the security gate). Continue in the right lane as the road bends right, a chapel will be on your right. Carnegie Mellon’s Building 23 is directly to your left. Make an immediate left into the Building 23 parking lot. You are now in the back of Building 23. Follow the signs/lights to the main entrance in the front of the building. Turn right at the main entrance to reach Rm 118 located in the 1st floor of bldg 23.

----------------------------- Past Events -------------------------

PDE Control: Designs and Applications

Miroslav Krstic, University of California, San Diego

Date & Time: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 01:30 PM PDT

Registration (for headcount): http://pdecontrol.eventbrite.com

Location: Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, Building 23, Moffett Field, CA, Room 118

Registration Fee: None

Abstract: In addition to classical physical applications such as fluid flows in engines, thermal dynamics in buildings, flexible wings of aircraft, electrochemistry in batteries, or plasmas in lasers and tokamaks, PDEs are effective in modeling large multi-agent systems as continua of networked agents, with applications ranging from vehicle formations to opinion dynamics. In its early period PDE control focused on replicating linear control methods (pole placement, LQG, H-infinity, etc) in infinite dimension. Over the last 15 years, a continuum version of the "backstepping" method has given rise to control design tools for nonlinear PDEs and PDEs with unknown functional coefficients. Backstepping designs now exist for each of the major PDE classes (parabolic, hyperbolic, real- and complex-valued, and of various orders in time and space). As a special case, continuum backstepping compensates delays of arbitrary length and dependence on time in general nonlinear ODE control systems. I will present a few design ideas and several applications, including deep oil drilling (where a large parametric uncertainty occurs), extruders in 3D printing (where a large delay is a nonlinear function of the value of the state), and deployment of 2D meshes of agents in 3D space (where deployment into complex surfaces necessarily gives rise to coupled unstable PDEs).

Biography:Miroslav Krstic holds the Daniel L. Alspach endowed chair and is the founding director of the Cymer Center for Control Systems and Dynamics at UC San Diego. He also serves as Associate Vice Chancellor for Research at UCSD. As a graduate student, Krstic won the UC Santa Barbara best dissertation award and student best paper awards at both CDC and ACC. Krstic is a Fellow of IEEE, IFAC, ASME, and IET (UK), and a Distinguished Visiting Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering. He has received the PECASE, NSF Career, and ONR Young Investigator awards, the Axelby and Schuck paper prizes, the Chestnut textbook prize, and the first UCSD Research Award given to an engineer. Krstic has held the Springer Visiting Professorship at UC Berkeley. He serves as Senior Editor in IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control and Automatica, as editor of two Springer book series, and has served as Vice President for Technical Activities of the IEEE Control Systems Society and as chair of the IEEE CSS Fellow Committee. Krstic has coauthored ten books on adaptive, nonlinear, and stochastic control, extremum seeking, control of PDE systems including turbulent flows, and control of delay systems.

Directions: Exit 101 on Moffett Blvd Exit and proceed to the Security Gate. You will pass through the security gate to reach the campus. A valid driver’s license, state ID, or federal ID is required. When presenting your ID, let them know you are going to Carnegie Mellon.

After Passing Through the Security Gate: Once you proceed through security gate, move into the right lane before you approach the “Y” in the road (about 200 yards from the security gate). Continue in the right lane as the road bends right, a chapel will be on your right. Carnegie Mellon’s Building 23 is directly to your left. Make an immediate left into the Building 23 parking lot. You are now in the back of Building 23. Follow the signs/lights to the main entrance in the front of the building. Turn right at the main entrance to reach Rm 118 located in the 1st floor of bldg 23.

Optical Flow Computations for Solar Irradiance Prediction

Sergey Koltakov, Locus Energy

Date & Time: Monday, March 17, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PST

Registration (for headcount): http://opticalflow.eventbrite.com

Location: Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, Building 23, Moffett Field, CA, Room 118

Registration Fee: None

Abstract: We describe our method of short-term solar irradiance forecasting. The method is based on prediction of cloud evolution via optical flow computations from NASA satellite imagery. The future cloud configuration is determined and input to Locus Energy’s irradiance estimation model to predict irradiance. Our forecasting model was calibrated and validated against NOAA’s Surface Radiation network observations; we then further enhance our prediction accuracy by leveraging data from PV installations and weather sensors monitored by Locus Energy.

Biography:Sergey Koltakov was born in Kharkov, Ukraine. He earned his BS/MS in Applied Mathematics, as well as BS in Finance, from Kharkov State University. After graduation, Sergey continued his graduate studies at Stanford University, from which he received an MS in Scientific Computing and a PhD in Computational Engineering. His first PhD dissertation was in Physically-based Modeling for Computer Graphics. As a byproduct of his research, he developed a high-fidelity virtual surgery system. He then switched fields and completed his doctorate in Environmental Fluid Mechanics, modeling turbulent flows in shallow estuaries with uneven bathymetry on supercomputers. Recently Sergey has been working in the field of alternative energy as a Head Scientist for Locus Energy, where he contributed to development of a patent-pending system to model and forecast solar irradiance based on NASA satellite imagery, supplemented by various ground-based irradiance sources.

Directions: Exit 101 on Moffett Blvd Exit and proceed to the Security Gate. You will pass through the security gate to reach the campus. A valid driver’s license, state ID, or federal ID is required. When presenting your ID, let them know you are going to Carnegie Mellon.

After Passing Through the Security Gate: Once you proceed through security gate, move into the right lane before you approach the “Y” in the road (about 200 yards from the security gate). Continue in the right lane as the road bends right, a chapel will be on your right. Carnegie Mellon’s Building 23 is directly to your left. Make an immediate left into the Building 23 parking lot. You are now in the back of Building 23. Follow the signs/lights to the main entrance in the front of the building. Turn right at the main entrance to reach Rm 118 located in the 1st floor of bldg 23.

A Tale of Three Actuators: How Mechanics, Business Models and Position Sensing Affect Different Mechatronic Servo Problems

Daniel Abramovitch, Agilent Technologies

Date & Time: Tuesday, December 10, 2013 7:00 PM PST

Registration (for headcount): http://totactuators.eventbrite.com

Location: Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, Building 23, Moffett Field, CA, Room 118

Registration Fee: None

Abstract:Students studying control problems often learn a lot ofwondrous algorithms that impart near mythical properties to the systems that they are applied to. At least this is how it works in theory and simulation. In practice, however, a thorough understanding of the system, the use model, and the market is often far more important than the differences between any two optimization algorithms. Knowing when and where a particular algorithm is useful is typically at the heart ofreal control problems.

This talk will focus on three servo systems with which the speaker has had considerable experience: hard disks, optical disks, and atomic force microscopes. By examining how the particulars of these three systems affect the use of control algorithms, the speaker will try to extract some general lessons.

Biography:

Daniel Abramovitch was born in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and grew up in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. He earned degrees in Electrical Engineering from Clemson (BS) and Stanford (MS and Ph.D.), doing his doctoral work under the direction of Gene Franklin. Upon graduation, and after a brief stay at Ford Aerospace, he accepted a job at Hewlett-Packard Labs, working on control issues for optical and magnetic disk drives for 11 1/2 years. He moved to Agilent Laboratories shortly after the spin off from Hewlett-Packard, where he has spent the last 13 1/2 years working on test and measurement systems. Danny is a Senior Member of the IEEE and was Vice Chair for Industry and Applications for the 2004 American Control Conference (ACC) in Boston. He is Vice Chair for Workshops at the 2006 ACC in Minneapolis and for Special Sessions at the 2007 ACC in New York. He will be Vice Chair for Industry and Applications for the 2009 ACC in St. Louis, Program Chair for the 2013 ACC, and General Chair of the 2016 ACC.. He has helped organize conference tutorial sessions on topics as varied as disk drives, atomic force microscopes, phase-locked loops, laser interferometry, and how business models and mechanics affect control design. He served as the Chair of the IEEE CSS History Committee from 2001 to 2010. Danny is credited with the original idea for the clocking mechanism behind the DVD+RW optical disk format and is co-inventor on the fundamental patent. He was on the team that prototyped Agilent?s first 40Gbps Bit Error Rate Tester (BERT) and was able to cite a Douglas Adams book in one of his patents relating to that device. Along with his co-author, Gene Franklin, he was awarded the 2003 IEEE Control Systems Magazine Outstanding Paper Award. His favorite paper remains the one prompted by a question from his then 3-year-old son, which showed that the outrigger was a feedback mechanism that predated the water clock by at least a 1000 years. He currently is doing research on future atomic force microscopes and high precision interferometers for Agilent.

Directions: Exit 101 on Moffett Blvd Exit and proceed to the Security Gate. You will pass through the security gate to reach the campus. A valid driver’s license, state ID, or federal ID is required. When presenting your ID, let them know you are going to Carnegie Mellon.

After Passing Through the Security Gate: Once you proceed through security gate, move into the right lane before you approach the “Y” in the road (about 200 yards from the security gate). Continue in the right lane as the road bends right, a chapel will be on your right. Carnegie Mellon’s Building 23 is directly to your left. Make an immediate left into the Building 23 parking lot. You are now in the back of Building 23. Follow the signs/lights to the main entrance in the front of the building. Turn right at the main entrance to reach Rm 118 located in the 1st floor of bldg 23.

Intelligent Systems: An Assessment of the Past and the Prospects for the Future

Prof. Okyay Kaynak, Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bogazici University, Istanbul

Date & Time: Monday, November 25th, 2013 1:30 PM PST

Location: Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, Building 23,Moffett Field, CA, Room 118

Registration Fee: None

Abstract: The last decade of the last millennium is characterized by what might be called the intelligent systems revolution. As a result of this, it is now possible to have man-made systems which exhibit the ability to reason, learn from experience and make rational decisions without human intervention. The phrase MIQ (machine intelligence quotient) was coined by Professor Lotfali Askar Zadeh of the University of California, Berkeley to describe a measure of intelligence of man-made systems. In this perspective, an intelligent system can be defined as a system that has a high MIQ.

In this presentation the state-of-the-art research in intelligent systems is discussed providing examples and a perspective on the future. The reasons behind the slow pace of developments will also be discussed. The talk will close with a consideration of the possible research directions in mechatronics and robotics as driving forces behind the development of intelligent systems.

Biography:

Okyay Kaynak received the B.Sc. degree with first class honors and Ph.D. degrees in electronic and electrical engineering from the University of Birmingham, UK, in 1969 and 1972 respectively. From 1972 to 1979, he held various positions within the industry that included 3.5 years in Saudi Arabia, working as a project engineer. In 1979, he joined the Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey, where he is presently a Full Professor. He has served as the Chairman of the Computer Engineering and the Electrical and Electronic Engineering Departments and as the Director of Biomedical Engineering Institute at this university. Currently, he is the UNESCO Chair on Mechatronics and the Director of Mechatronics Research and Application Centre. He has hold long-term (near to or more than a year) Visiting Professor/Scholar positions at various institutions in Japan, Germany, U.S., Singapore and China. His current research interests are in the fields of intelligent control and mechatronics. He has authored three books, edited five and authored or coauthored more than 400 papers that have appeared in various journals, books and conference proceedings.

Dr. Kaynak is a fellow of IEEE. He is or has served on the Editorial or Advisory Boards of a number of scholarly journals. Currently he is an Associate Editor of IEEE Sensors Journal, and IEEE Trans. on Industrial Informatics, and theincoming Editor-in-Chief of IEEE/ASME Trans. on Mechatronics. Dr. Kaynak is active in internationally organizations, has served on many committees of IEEE and was the president of IEEE Industrial Electronics Society during 2002-2003. He received IEEE Third Millennium Medal (2000), IEEE/IES Anthony J. Hornfeck Service Award (2005) and IEEE/IES Dr.-Ing. Eugene Mittelman Achievement Award (2011). He has recently been awarded the prestigious Qianren (1000 Talents Program) professorship at Harbin Institute of Technology, China.

Laser Interferometers and Quintessential Phase: Overcoming Turbulence

Dr. Daniel Abramovitch, Agilent Laboratories, Santa Clara, CA

Date: Friday, October 4th, 2013 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM PST

Registration Required (for headcount): https://ieeecislaserinterferometer.eventbrite.com

Location: Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, Building 23,Moffett Field, CA, Room 118

Abstract: Laser interferometers are amazingly precise measurement tools for making non-contact measurements with sub nanometer precision over a huge dynamic range. In reality a laser interferometer measures not distance, but the change in optical path length between itself and a moving object. This measurement relies on a precision knowledge of the laser wavelength, which can be affected by a number of factors, including, and most annoyingly, turbulence. Turbulence, in this case pressure variations of air in the measurement path, have vexed interferometry for years, yielding a variety of methods to reduce the consequences. Most recently, the method called Quintessential Phase (QP) was developed which using a multi-segment optical detector and an Extended Kalman Filter, makes the turbulence observable so that it can be removed from the distance calculation. This talk will give a brief introduction to laser interferometry before discussing the turbulence problem and the QP solution.

Biography:

Daniel Abramovitch was born in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and grew up in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. He earned degrees in Electrical Engineering from Clemson (BS) and Stanford (MS and Ph.D.), doing his doctoral work under the direction of Gene Franklin. Upon graduation, and after a brief stay at Ford Aerospace, he accepted a job at Hewlett-Packard Labs, working on control issues for optical and magnetic disk drives for 11 1/2 years. He moved to Agilent Laboratories shortly after the spin off from Hewlett-Packard, where he has spent the last 13 1/2 years working on test and measurement systems. Danny is a Senior Member of the IEEE and was Vice Chair for Industry and Applications for the 2004 American Control Conference (ACC) in Boston. He is Vice Chair for Workshops at the 2006 ACC in Minneapolis and for Special Sessions at the 2007 ACC in New York. He will be Vice Chair for Industry and Applications for the 2009 ACC in St. Louis, Program Chair for the 2013 ACC, and General Chair of the 2016 ACC.. He has helped organize conference tutorial sessions on topics as varied as disk drives, atomic force microscopes, phase-locked loops, laser interferometry, and how business models and mechanics affect control design. He served as the Chair of the IEEE CSS History Committee from 2001 to 2010. Danny is credited with the original idea for the clocking mechanism behind the DVD+RW optical disk format and is co-inventor on the fundamental patent. He was on the team that prototyped Agilent?s first 40Gbps Bit Error Rate Tester (BERT) and was able to cite a Douglas Adams book in one of his patents relating to that device. Along with his co-author, Gene Franklin, he was awarded the 2003 IEEE Control Systems Magazine Outstanding Paper Award. His favorite paper remains the one prompted by a question from his then 3-year-old son, which showed that the outrigger was a feedback mechanism that predated the water clock by at least a 1000 years. He currently is doing research on future atomic force microscopes and high precision interferometers for Agilent.

Directions: Exit 101 on Moffett Blvd Exit and proceed to the Security Gate. You will pass through the security gate to reach the campus. A valid driver’s license, state ID, or federal ID is required. When presenting your ID, let them know you are going to Carnegie Mellon.

After Passing Through the Security Gate: Once you proceed through security gate, move into the right lane before you approach the “Y” in the road (about 200 yards from the security gate). Continue in the right lane as the road bends right, a chapel will be on your right. Carnegie Mellon’s Building 23 is directly to your left. Make an immediate left into the Building 23 parking lot. You are now in the back of Building 23. Follow the signs/lights to the main entrance in the front of the building. Turn right at the main entrance to reach Rm 118 located in the 1st floor of bldg 23.

Disturbance Accommodating Adaptive Control with Application to Wind Turbines

Dr. Susan Frost, Intelligent Systems Division, NASA Ames Research Center, CA

Date: Wednesday, December 5th, 2012, 6:45-8:00pm

Registration Required (for headcount): http://ieeeciswindcontrol.eventbrite.com

Location: Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, Building 23,Moffett Field, CA, Room 118

Abstract: Adaptive control techniques are well suited to applications that have unknown modeling parameters and poorly known operating conditions. Many physical systems experience external disturbances that are persistent or continually recurring. Flexible structures and systems with compliance between components often form a class of systems that fail to meet standard requirements for adaptive control. For these classes of systems, a residual mode filter can restore the ability of the adaptive controller to perform in a stable manner. New theory will be presented that enables adaptive control with accommodation of persistent disturbances using residual mode filters. After a short introduction to some of the control challenges of large utility-scale wind turbines, this theory will be applied to a high-fidelity simulation of a wind turbine.

Biography:

Dr. Frost is a research engineer with NASA Ames Research Center working on control problems for aircraft and wind turbines. She has the following degrees: PhD, MS Electrical Engineering, and MS Mathematics from the University of Wyoming and BA Mathematics from Wellesley College.

Directions: Exit 101 on Moffett Blvd Exit and proceed to the Security Gate. You will pass through the security gate to reach the campus. A valid driver’s license, state ID, or federal ID is required. When presenting your ID, let them know you are going to Carnegie Mellon.

After Passing Through the Security Gate: Once you proceed through security gate, move into the right lane before you approach the “Y” in the road (about 200 yards from the security gate). Continue in the right lane as the road bends right, a chapel will be on your right. Carnegie Mellon’s Building 23 is directly to your left. Make an immediate left into the Building 23 parking lot. You are now in the back of Building 23. Follow the signs/lights to the main entrance in the front of the building. Turn right at the main entrance to reach Rm 118 located in the 1st floor of bldg 23.