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Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society



Santa Clara Valley Chapter Monthly Meeting


SCV EMBS Meetings are usually scheduled for the third Wednesday of each month, except July, August, and December. The formal presentation is 7:30 - 8:30 pm. Afterwards, there is an opportunity to network.

The usual meeting location is in Room M114 of the Medical School on Stanford Campus). M114 is in the corner closest to the Clark Bioscience Building.



Meet the Speaker
An optional, no-host dinner with the speaker precedes each meeting, and you are invited. We gather in the Stanford Hospital cafeteria at 6:15 pm. No reservation is needed.


Upcoming EMBS Meeting
Wednesday, September 20, 2017 at 7:30pm
Room M-114, Stanford University Medical School

Title: kV X-ray Digital Tomosynthesis Image Tracking of Respiratory Motion During The Delivery of MV Radiotherapy Treatment of Cancer
Speaker: Larry Partain
Director of Clinical Research, Silicon Valley Operations, TeleSecurity Sciences

Abstract:
External beam radiotherapy, widely applied in the treatment cancer, directs a constantly re-shaped beam of gamma rays (i.e. MeV photons) from outside a patient to non-surgically enter the patient's body to destroy a malignant lesion, as this focused treatment beam circles the patient's body, for a lesion positioned near the center of rotation. A priority early application is treatment of lung cancer in free breathing patients where the cancer lesion can easily move up and down a cm or more during respiratory cycles (every 4 to 6 sec.) for continuous treatments that can typically last a minute or more. Since real time viewing of respiratory motion of objects has not usually been available during radiotherapy, the standard protocol delivers this lethal dose over the total volume traversed by the lesion during multiple breathing cycles. Unfortunately this directly kills about 2% of the patients treated and seriously injures a larger fraction due to the radiation damage to healthy surrounding lung tissues, the heart, the spinal cord and other "organs at risk" including the ribs. The success of this x-ray tomosynthesis tracking technology has the potential to significantly reduce the magnitude of such collateral damage.

Biography:
Larry Partain is the Director of Clinical Research, Silicon Valley Operations, Los Altos, CA for TeleSecurity Sciences headquartered in Las Vegas, NV. Much of his professional career has focused on translational research with electronic devices and systems that offer a promise to substantially improve management of cancer or other diseases. Past successes as Director of Marketing and Advanced Technology, at Varian Medical Systems, include his participation in the application of flat plate, amorphous silicon, digital imagers to the replacement of X-ray film and to their implementation in cone beam CT systems that provide image guidance for radiotherapy treatment of cancer. His recent opportunities at TeleSecurity Sciences now offer the potential to combine this imager technology with the disruptive capabilities of scanned electron beam X-ray sources that promise major improvements in the motion tracking of lung cancer in real time in free breathing patients during the administration of radiotherapy. This has the potential to substantially reduce collateral damage to surrounding healthy lung tissues and to other organs at risk including the heart, aorta, spinal cord, ribs and chest wall. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University. He is the recipient of 29 US Patents and the author or co-author of 72 scientific articles in journals, book chapters and conference proceedings.




Parking at Stanford
Parking is available in the structure at the corner of East Campus Drive and Roth Way. Parking is free after 4pm.
Parking is also available in the Stanford hospital parking structure off Pasteur Drive and Blake Wilbur Drive, but there is a fee.


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