2015 Events

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February 3 2015: "Next Generation Video and Displays" by Ajit Ninan, Senior Director of Cinema Technology Engineering, Dolby Laboratories

Bio and Abstract

Ajit Ninan, Senior Director of Cinema Technology Engineering, leads innovation and development of next generation display technology at Dolby. His accomplishments includes a state of the art display which is 40 times brighter with 800 times more contrast than a conventional TV while supporting wider color range of cinema. Developed over 4 years ago, there is still no display in the world that can match its capabilities. Recently Ninan developed a first ever, 32" display using quantum dot technology which provides over 16 F-stops of dynamic range and peak light output of 2000 Nits yet being low power proving high brightness with energy efficiency is possible. He is a world class expert in display technology and key member of the Dolby technology strategy team. Ninan is also an active contributor to international standards work in JPEG particularly regarding high dynamic range imagery.

March 10, 2015: "Emerging Trends and Applications in Light Field Displays" by Prof. Gordon Wetzstein, Stanford University

Abstract

Many people believe that the recent hype about stereoscopic 3D displays is over; at least for the moment. Part of the reason why 3D television in particular is not widely adopted by consumers may be the lack of a truly unique or useful enhancement of the 2D viewing experience. Nevertheless, light field displays are expected to be "the future of 3D displays". So what makes people believe that a new technology delivering an experience that consumers haven't adopted in the past will work in the future? In this talk, we discuss a wide range of unconventional applications that are facilitated by light field technology and, perhaps, benefit much more from emerging capabilities than traditional television does. We begin with a short, historical review of light field displays and recent trends towards compressive light field display, followed by a discussion of applications in projection systems, vision assessment and correction, wearable displays, and a brief comparison to holography.

Biography

Prior to joining Stanford University's Electrical Engineering Department as an Assistant Professor in 2014, Gordon Wetzstein was a Research Scientist in the Camera Culture Group at the MIT Media Lab. His research focuses on computational imaging and display systems as well as computational light transport. At the intersection of computer graphics, machine vision, optics, scientific computing, and perception, this research has a wide range of applications in next-generation consumer electronics, scientific imaging, human-computer interaction, remote sensing, and many other areas. Gordon's cross-disciplinary approach to research has been funded by DARPA, NSF, Samsung, Intel, and other grants from industry sponsors and research councils. In 2006, Gordon graduated with Honors from the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany, and he received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of British Columbia in 2011. His doctoral dissertation focuses on computational light modulation for image acquisition and display and won the Alain Fournier Ph.D. Dissertation Annual Award. He organized the IEEE 2012 and 2013 International Workshops on Computational Cameras and Displays, founded displayblocks.org as a forum for sharing computational display design instructions with the DIY community, and presented a number of courses on Computational Displays and Computational Photography at ACM SIGGRAPH. Gordon won best paper awards at the International Conference on Computational Photography (ICCP) in 2011 and 2014 as well as a Laval Virtual Award in 2005.

April 21, 2015: "Entrepreneural Engineering: how I built two startups and lessons from other entrepreneurs." by Prof. John Bowers, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, UCSB

Abstract

The photonics and telecommunication field has been a fertile ground for startups, with numerous successful startup businesses being started by the author and his colleagues at UCSB. The author will discuss his personal experience in starting several successful companies. He will discuss entrance strategies for getting funding, including bootstrapping, government research grants, angel investors, and VCs. Next, hiring and growth - what kind of people to hire, how to concentrate on key risk points early, how to minimize cash burn rate, and how to go for future funding rounds. Exit strategies, including acquisition, IP sale, or IPO will conclude this section of the discussion. Many case studies from entrepreneurs who have spoken in his course will be used as case studies. The author will conclude by talking about promising areas for future startups.

Biography

Professor Bowers' research interests are in energy efficiency and in the development of novel optoelectronic devices for the next generation of optical networks. His research interests include silicon photonics and integrated circuits, optical switching, the design of quantum well structures for high speed light generation and detection, and the design of high speed time division multiplexed systems and devices. Prior to joining UCSB in 1987, Professor Bowers worked at AT&T Bell Laboratories on semiconductor lasers and photodetectors. Professor Bowers is Director of the Institute for Energy Efficiency and a member of the Technology Management Program (TMP). Professor Bowers started a series of special courses called "Entrepreneural Engineering", which evolved into a special program at UCSB for students from a variety of disciplines to learn about starting new businesses.

Affiliations

Technology Management Program Institute for Energy Efficiency (IEE) California Nanosystems Institute (CNSI) Silicon Photonics Center Center for Energy Efficient Materials (CEEM) Terabit Optical Ethernet Center (TOEC)

Awards/Honors

2009 Kavli Chair for Nanotechnology, 2009 OSA 2009 Nick Holonyak, Jr., Award, 2009 IEEE Transactions on Components and Packaging Technologies Best Paper of 2006 Award, 2007 Discover Magazine list of top 100 achievments, 2006 PC World Technical Excellence Award for Best Semiconductor Technology, 2006 National Academy of Engineering, 2005 Fellow of the Optical Society of America, 2002 Fellow of the American Physical Society, 1996 IEEE Leos William Streifer Award, 1996 Board of Governors, IEEE Lasers and Electro-optics Society, 1995 Fellow, IEEE, 1994 Distinguished Lecturer, IEEE, 1992 Presidential Young Investigator, National Science Foundation, 1988

Biography

Professor Bowers' research interests are in energy efficiency and in the development of novel optoelectronic devices for the next generation of optical networks. His research interests include silicon photonics and integrated circuits, optical switching, the design of quantum well structures for high speed light generation and detection, and the design of high speed time division multiplexed systems and devices. Prior to joining UCSB in 1987, Professor Bowers worked at AT&T Bell Laboratories on semiconductor lasers and photodetectors. Professor Bowers is Director of the Institute for Energy Efficiency and a member of the Technology Management Program (TMP). Professor Bowers started a series of special courses called "Entrepreneural Engineering", which evolved into a special program at UCSB for students from a variety of disciplines to learn about starting new businesses.

June 4, 2015:

Title

Light Paves the Way to Single-Molecule Detection and Photocontrol, Foundations of Super-Resolution Microscopy

Speaker

Prof. W. E. Moerner, Professor of Chemistry & Professor of Applied Physics - Stanford, 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Abstract

More than 25 years ago, low temperature experiments aimed at establishing the ultimate limits to optical storage in solids led to the first optical detection and spectroscopy of a single molecule in the condensed phase. At this unexplored ultimate limit, many surprises occurred where single molecules showed both spontaneous changes (blinking) and light-driven control of emission, properties that were also observed in 1997 at room temperature with single green fluorescent protein variants. These observations form foundations for super-resolution microscopy beyond the diffraction limit with single molecules, and tracking of single molecules in cells continues to yield surprises.

Biography

W. E. Moerner, the Harry S. Mosher Professor of Chemistry and Professor, by courtesy, of Applied Physics at Stanford Univ., conducts research in physical chemistry and chemical physics of single molecules, single-molecule biophysics, super-resolution imaging and tracking in cells, and trapping of single molecules in solution. His interests span methods of precise quantitation of single-molecule properties, to strategies for three-dimensional imaging and tracking of single molecules, to applications of single-molecule measurements to understand biological processes in cells, to observations of the photodynamics of single photosynthetic proteins and enzymes. He has been elected Fellow/Member of the NAS, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, AAAS, ACS, APS, and The Optical Society. Major awards include the Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy, the Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics, the Pittsburgh Spectroscopy Award, the Peter Debye Award in Physical Chemistry, the Wolf Prize in Chemistry, and the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.


June 17, 2015:

The IEEE Control Systems Society (CSS) - Santa Clara Valley Chapter is proud to present:

(Co-sponsors: IEEE Robotics & Automation Society, IEEE Photonics Society)


Challenges in Large Telescope Control


Dirk De Mol , National Instruments

Title

Challenges in Large Telescope Control

Speaker

Dirk De Mol - National Instruments

Abstract

Control of large, modern telescopes involves a lot more than movement and pointing. After some telescope basics, I will talk about different telescope designs, specifically the South Africa Large Telescope (10m), the Keck (10m) in Hawaii and the European Extremely Large Telescope (39m) which is being built in the Atacama Desert in Chile. Several cost/performance criteria will be discussed. Challenging controls in modern telescopes include active mirror control to obtain a perfect optical shape of the main mirror, segmented or not, and adaptive control to negate the effects of atmospheric turbulence. Up and coming telescopes will include up to 1000 hexagonal mirror segments and that turns active control into a 3000x6000 control problem as each mirror contains 3 actuators and 6 edge sensors. Adaptive controls are even more challenging: the EELT is planning on 8000 actuators and a 1 msec control rate. Some actual control implementations will be shown, programmed in LabVIEW, a dataflow language that lends itself well to parallel execution.

Biography

Dirk De Mol holds MS degrees in both Electro-Mechanical Engineering (State University of Gent, Belgium) aas well as Chemical Engineering/Process Control (University of California - Sannta Barbara). He worked for 20 years as a control systems engineer for Measurex/Honeywell, developing large control systems for the sheet industries (paper/plastics/metals) and was the principal architect for their latest generation, LabVIEW based, control system. Dirk joined National Instruments in 2003 and is principal architect for LabVIEW based software systems. He's an avid amateur astronomer and has worked on the software for the 10 meter South African Large Telescope (SALT) and has been involved in National Instruments' offerings for the European Extremely Large Telescope (EELT) and the 30-meter telescope (TMT).

July 7, 2015

Title:

Better Living Through Atomic Physics

Speaker:

Dr. Jamil Abo-Shaeer, AOSense, Inc.

Abstract:

Atomic systems are the standard-bearers for measurements of time, distance, and mass. Indeed, many civilian- and defense-critical applications require exceptionally precise time and frequency standards enabled only by atomic clocks. The Global Positioning System (GPS) and smart-grid power distribution are two key examples. Atom-based measurement devices benefit from the exquisite properties of the atom, which include stable frequency transitions, precise initialization, control, and readout of the atomic state, and environmental isolation. Moreover, atomic properties are absolute, and do not drift over time. Recent laboratory-based atomic sensors promise to enable new capabilities such as GPS-free navigation and high-bandwidth communication. Fielding these devices, however, is a considerable engineering challenge that companies such as AOSense are now actively addressing.

Bio of Dr. Jamil Abo-Shaeer:

Dr. Jamil Abo-Shaeer is the Director of Strategic Planning at AOSense, Inc., a leading developer and manufacturer of innovative atom-optic devices for precision navigation, gravity measurement, and timekeeping. Prior to joining AOSense, Jamil was a program manager at DARPA where he developed and managed research programs in quantum metrology, cavity optomechanics, quantum simulation, and ultrafast lasers. Jamil received his Ph.D. in physics from MIT studying the properties of ultracold gases under rotation. As a postdoctoral fellow at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, his research focused on a precision measurement of the beta-neutrino correlation coefficient in laser-trapped sodium-21 for testing the Standard Model of Physics. Dr. Abo-Shaeer received his BA in physics from the University of California, Berkeley.

August 11, 2015:

Title:

Optical Data Center Networks & Technologies

Speaker:

Dr. Hong Liu, Principal Engineer at Google Technical Infrastructure

Abstract:

Dr. Hong Liu will review the network transformations that have resulted from the rise of Internet computing applications. She will talk about the architectural structures of warehouse-scale computers (WSCs) and the underlying optical technologies used to implement WSC datacenters. Dr. Liu will cover both intra-datacenter and inter-datacenter networks, the challenges facing datacenter operators in the next 3 to 4 years, and the desirable optical networking technologies to sustain the growth of Internet computing applications. Dr. Hong's 3hr course at OFC 2015 on optical data center networks was a full-house, and specially relevant to the optical transceiver designers, optical transmission engineers.

Bio of Dr. Hong Liu:

Hong Liu is a Principal Engineer at Google Technical Infrastructure, where she is involved in the system architecture and interconnect for a large-scale computing platform. Her research interests include interconnection networks, high-speed signaling, optical access and metro design. Prior to joining Google, Hong was a Member of Technical Staff at Juniper Networks, where she worked on the architecture and design of network core routers and multi-chassis switches. Hong received her Ph.D in electrical engineering from Stanford University.

September 1, 2015

Title:

LEIA Inc -- Mobile Holography

Speaker:

Dr. David Fattal, CEO of LEIA Inc.

Abstract:

Manipulating holograms in the palm of your hand.

At LEIA inc. we are developing an LCD-based interactive holographic display specially designed for mobile devices. The technology at its core relies on a recent breakthrough in the field of photonics, a "Multiview Backlight" that was featured on the cover of Nature for its disruptive potential in the field of mobile displays. Paired-up with a standard LCD/touch panel, the multiview backlight allows the projection of fully interactive holographic video content with smooth, full-parallax 3D effect, yet retains an ultra-slim form factor and low energy consumption that are a must for mobile devices.

In this talk, I will present some fundamental aspects of the technology and will discuss various applications to the mobile, medical and automotive industries. I will also introduce LEIA's holographic Development Kit, scheduled for release in Q4 2015.

Bio of Dr. David Fattal

David Fattal is the founder and CEO of LEIA Inc, a Silicon Valley startup developing an interactive holographic display for mobile devices. He previously spent 9 years as a senior researcher in the Intelligent Infrastructure Laboratory at HP Labs, working on various aspects of quantum computing and photonics, and specializing in the manipulation of light at the nanoscale. He holds a PhD in Physics from Stanford University and a BS in theoretical physics from Ecole Polytechnique, France. David received the 2010 Pierre Faurre award for young French industrial career achievement, and was named French Innovator of the year 2013 by the MIT technology Review before featuring on the global innovator list that same year. David has 70 granted patents and co-authored the text-book "Single Photon Devices and Applications". He was recently awarded the French National Order of Merit for inventing the "Multiview Backlight" concept.

November 2, 2015 (note: Monday, not the usual Tuesday)

Title: High-Capacity Optical Communications Using Multiplexing of Multiple Orbital-Angular-Momentum Modes

Speaker:

Prof. Alan Willner, USC, Los Angeles, CA

Abstract:

The ability to multiplex multiple, spatially overlapping data-carrying modes over the same physical medium represents the potential for increasing system capacity and spectral efficiency. Generating different amounts of orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) on different optical beams has emerged as a technique for such mode multiplexing. A beam can carry OAM if its phase front twists in a helical fashion as it propagates, and the amount of OAM corresponds to the number of 2*pi phase shifts that occur in the azimuthal direction. Each OAM beam is orthogonal and can be efficiently multiplexed and demultiplexed with little inherent crosstalk, and OAM is compatible with other forms of multiplexing (e.g., polarization multiplexing and WDM). This presentation will explore the achievements of and challenges to OAM-based free-space (and fiber) optical communication systems, including transmission, turbulence compensation, link design, and switching.


Bio of Prof. Alan Willner:

Alan Willner (Ph.D., 1988, Columbia) worked at AT&T Bell Labs and Bellcore, and he is currently the Steven and Kathryn Sample Chair in Engineering at the Univ. of Southern California. He has received the International Fellow of U.K. Royal Academy of Engineering; Presidential Faculty Fellows Award from the White House; IEEE Sumner Award; Guggenheim, Packard, and Fulbright Foundation Fellowships; OSA Forman Engineering Excellence Award; IEEE Photonics Society Engineering Achievement Award; SPIE President's Award; IEEE Globecom Best Paper Award; Eddy Best Contributed Technical Paper Award from Pennwell; and Fellow of National Academy of Inventors. He is Fellow of AAAS, IEEE, OSA, and SPIE. Prof. Willner has been Co-Chair of the U.S. National Academies Study on Optics and Photonics; President-Elect of OSA; President of IEEE Photonics Society; Editor-in-Chief of Optics Letters and Journal of Lightwave Technology; and General Co-Chair of CLEO. Prof. Willner has >1100 publications, primarily in optical communications and signal processing.