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Institute of Electrical
and Electronic Engineers

IEEE
Central Texas Section

Power and Energy, Industrial Applications,
Power Electronics and Industrial Electronics
Joint Society
Austin Chapter

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Announcements and Events
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May 23: Life At The Edge - Operating And Designing A Whole Home Residential Microgrid

Location: Cover 3, 2700 W Anderson Ln #202, Austin, TX 78757

Times:

Early Arrival - 6:00 to 6:30 PM

Social & Business Meeting - 6:30 to 7:00 PM

Program -7:00 to 8:30 PM

RSVP: RSVPs appreciated (but not required) by sending an email to pi2-secretary@ieee.org

Cover Charge: We pay Cover 3 to use their private meeting room and ask that all attendees help defray our costs by ordering dinner or paying a $15 cover charge.

Abstract: The presentation will cover design basics, data collected during operation and lessons learned from operating two 9.6kWh energy storage systems/microgrids in Austin residential structures with solar and electric vehicles.

Speaker: Scott Hinson, Director of Engineering at Pecan Street Inc.



Biography: Scott leads the development of the Pike Powers Commercialization Lab. He worked at a thin film CIGS solar module manufacturer where he led module packaging, performance, certification and reliability efforts. Prior efforts include work in the military, medical, consumer and oil industries developing power supplies, precision measurement equipment and inductive heating technologies. Scott received his B.S.E.E. from The University of Texas at Austin with undergraduate specializations in both communications systems and power distribution.

May 27: Tour of University of Texas Austin Utilities Power Plant


This will be a walking tour, preceded by a 30-45-minute presentation; there is an elevator for those who cannot use the stairs.

Often described as the largest and most integrated microgrid in the U.S., the UT Austin Carl J. Eckhardt Combined Heat and Power plant (CHP) is capable of generating 135 MW (megawatts) power (63 MW peak) and 1.2 million lb/hr (pounds per hour) of steam (300,000 peak). The single largest electrical load on campus is the cooling system that can provide 60,000 tons (33,000 tons peak) of chilled water to the campus. The Power Complex provides 100 percent of campus electricity and heating. Our five chilling stations and 9.5 million gallons of chilled water in two thermal storage tanks satisfy the cooling requirements for 17 million square foot in more than 150 campus buildings serving 70,000 faculty, students and staff. The complex provides the university with an independent utility system with full islanding capabilities and has electrical ties to the City of Austin electrical grid as an emergency backup source of power.

$15 for IEEE members and $30 for non-IEEE members.

Registration: Registration closes the day before the tour.Be sure toread the complete agenda before registering at https://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/m/45084

Tour Leader: Rossen Tzartzev, Associate Director - Electrical Distribution & Elevator Services - UT Austin Utilities & Energy Management

Location: 215 East 24th Street, Austin, Texas 78712

Time:10:00 PM to 12:00 PM

June 27: An Over View of High Voltage DC Power Transmission

Location: Cover 3, 2700 W Anderson Ln #202, Austin, TX 78757

Times:

Early Arrival - 6:00 to 6:30 PM

Social & Business Meeting - 6:30 to 7:00 PM

Program -7:00 to 8:30 PM

RSVP: RSVPs appreciated (but not required) by sending an email to pi2-secretary@ieee.org

Cover Charge: We pay Cover 3 to use their private meeting room and ask that all attendees help defray our costs by ordering dinner or paying a $15 cover charge.

Abstract: The first modern HVDC link connected Gotland Island to the Swedish mainland. Commissioned in 1954, the link was direct current because the distance was too great for alternating current cables to be effective. The AC/DC and DC/AC conversion was enabled by mercury arc valves. By the early 1970s thyristor valves began replacing mercury arc valves, and until recently all systems have employed that technology. Now we have seen a new entry in the field, as gate turn-off family power semiconductors have led to high-level voltage source converters to enable new applications for HVDC links.

HVDC transmission has unique attributes. Examples of these include:

Long-distance bulk power transmission was the justification for the first modern-day (1970) HVDC link in the United States: the Pacific HVDC Intertie connecting the Celilo Station on the Columbia River to the Sylmar Station in the San Fernando Valley. Presently the link transmits 3100 MW a distance of 850 miles: its efficiency greatly exceeded that of EHV AC systems.

Soon after (1973), the first thyristor system was commissioned: the 320 MW Eel River back-to-back link. It asynchronously connected New Brunswick to Maine enabling the import of lower-price hydroelectric power. There are now numerous such links along the east-west boundary of the US grid, roughly along the Rocky Mountains (and at other locations). AC interconnections at those locations were not possible because of system weakness.

A consequence of the greatly increased world-wide interest in HVDC is that equipment suppliers are now seeing orders at levels unmatched in their experience. Systems are being planned for off-shore wind energy, long-distance high-capacity links at 800 kV/6400 MW, and multi-terminal meshed (grid) systems.


Speaker: Mehrdad (Mark) Ehsani, Ph. D., P. E., L.F. IEEE, F. SAE,
Robert M. Kennedy Professor, Sustainable Energy and Vehicle Engineering Program, Power Electronics & Motor Drives Laboratory, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Texas A&M University



Biography: Dr. Mark Ehsani, is the Robert M. Kennedy professor of engineering at Texas A&M University. He has won over 130 international honors and awards for technical contributions, is listed in the International Who’s Who of Professionals and also in Who’s Who in America, in American Education, in Science and Engineering, in Finance and Business, and in the 21st Century.  He is the Distinguished Lecturer of several professional societies.  He is the co-author of 17 books, over 400 publications, and holds over 24 US and European patents.

July 25: Remote Control & Monitoring of Electric Utility Systems...

Location: Cover 3, 2700 W Anderson Ln #202, Austin, TX 78757

Times:

Early Arrival - 6:00 to 6:30 PM

Social & Business Meeting - 6:30 to 7:00 PM

Program -7:00 to 8:30 PM

RSVP: RSVPs appreciated (but not required) by sending an email to pi2-secretary@ieee.org

Cover Charge: We pay Cover 3 to use their private meeting room and ask that all attendees help defray our costs by ordering dinner or paying a $15 cover charge.

Abstract: This presentation is intended to describe how Austin Energy uses technology to remotely monitor and control power grids. Today’s utilities are pushing technology beyond the “substation fence” out onto the distribution system, dramatically increasing our realtime “vision”. From sensors in the field to Human Machine Interfaces (HMIs) in the office, we bring the grid to operational experts charged with making power continuously available to the citizens of Austin, TX.

Speaker: Craig Schaub, Control Engineering Manager, Austin Energy



Biography: Craig manages a team of engineers, analysts and technicians responsible for large scale, realtime control systems (such as SCADA/EMS, ADMS and DERO). He has been directly involved in establishing electric utility remote control and monitoring systems for over 30 years. His background is rooted in protective relaying, telemetry and communication systems.

 

Personal Development Hour Certificates
You may pick up your PDH certificates for IEEE meetings at the checkin table.

 

The IEEE (PI)2 Austin Newsletter is a semi-monthly publication of the Austin Chapters of the Power & Energy, Power Electronics, Industrial Applications and Industrial Electronics Societies.

The newsletter is distributed via pi2-comm-chair@ieee.org and we welcome your feedback and suggestions for events or other information of interest to this community.

To sign up for our newsletter click HERE or type in: http://eepurl.com/bRiU8z

Analog Newsletter

The electronic IEEE Central Texas Section newsletter, The Analog, provides news of many of the other IEEE activities in the Austin and San Antonio areas. If you are an IEEE Central Texas Section member, your subscription is provided automatically to the email address in your IEEE profile. If you are not a member, you may subscribe following the procedures provided at the The Analog Webpage.

Be advised that there is not a lot of traffic on this list intentionally. The list manager tries to keep it below 3 emails a month - The Analog, the mid-month reminder, and maybe an emergency announcement, but we prefer 2 emails a month .

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